cherub

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cher·ub

 (chĕr′əb)
n.
1. pl. cher·u·bim (chĕr′ə-bĭm′, -yə-bĭm′)
a. A winged celestial being.
b. cherubim Christianity The second of the nine orders of angels in medieval angelology.
2. pl. cher·ubs
a. A putto.
b. A person, especially a child, with an innocent or chubby face.

[Middle English, from Late Latin, from Hebrew kərûb; see krb in Semitic roots.]

che·ru′bic (chə-ro͞o′bĭk) adj.
che·ru′bi·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cherub

(ˈtʃɛrəb)
n, pl cherubs or cherubim (ˈtʃɛrəbɪm; -ʊbɪm)
1. (Theology) theol a member of the second order of angels, whose distinctive gift is knowledge, often represented as a winged child or winged head of a child
2. an innocent or sweet child
[Old English, from Hebrew kěrūbh]
cherubic, cheˈrubical adj
cheˈrubically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cher•ub

(ˈtʃɛr əb)

n., pl. cher•ubs for 4; cher•u•bim (ˈtʃɛr ə bɪm, -yʊ bɪm) for 1, 2.
1. a celestial being. Gen. 3:24; Ezek. 1, 10.
2. a member of the second order of angels, often represented as a winged child.
3. a person, esp. a child, with a sweet, chubby face.
[before 900; Old English c(h)erubin, cerubim (all singular) < Latin cherūbim < Greek < Hebrew kərūbhīm (pl.)]
che•ru•bic (tʃəˈru bɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cherub - a sweet innocent babycherub - a sweet innocent baby    
babe, baby, infant - a very young child (birth to 1 year) who has not yet begun to walk or talk; "the baby began to cry again"; "she held the baby in her arms"; "it sounds simple, but when you have your own baby it is all so different"
2.cherub - an angel of the second order whose gift is knowledge; usually portrayed as a winged child
angel - spiritual being attendant upon God
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ملاك مَلاك ذو أجْنِحَه
andělíčekcherubín
englebarnkerub
kisangyal
kerúb
cherubinascherubino
ķerubs
cherubín
kerub
kanatlı çocuk yüzlü melek

cherub

[ˈtʃerəb] N (cherubs (pl))
1.querubín m, angelito m
2. (Rel) (cherubim (pl)) [ˈtʃerəbɪm]querubín m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cherub

[ˈtʃɛrəb] n (= angel) → chérubin m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cherub

n
pl <-im> (Eccl) → Cherub m
pl <-s> (Art) → Putte f, → Putto m (form); (= baby)Engelchen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cherub

[ˈtʃɛrəb] n
a. (cherubs (pl)) (child) → angioletto
b. (cherubim (pl)) [ˈtʃɛrəbɪm] (Rel) → cherubino
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cherub

(ˈtʃerəb) noun
an angel with wings and the plump face and body of a child.
cheˈrubic (-ˈruː-) adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
I wanted to show them our red plush furniture, and the trumpet-blowing cherubs the German paperhanger had put on our parlour ceiling.
He pointed to the picture of the Madonna, the upper part of which represented the conventional cherubs of Italian Art, celestially provided with sitting accommodation for their chins, on balloons of buff-coloured cloud.
To go over all those fat little legs, pulling on their stockings, to take in her arms and dip those little naked bodies, and to hear their screams of delight and alarm, to see the breathless faces with wide-open, scared, and happy eyes of all her splashing cherubs, was a great pleasure to her.
They were like the cherubs of the anecdote, who had-- morally, at any rate--nothing to whack!
According to the account of that officer, the frigate Phoebe, and two sloops of war Cherub and Raccoon, had sailed in convoy of the Isaac Todd from Rio Janeiro.
If the conventional Cherub could ever grow up and be clothed, he might be photographed as a portrait of Wilfer.
His might have been a cherub's mouth, had not the full, sensuous lips a trick, under stress, of drawing firmly across the teeth.
Meanwhile, Dorothy had dressed herself in a pretty gown of soft grey embroidered with silver, and put a blue-and-gold suit of satin upon little Button-Bright, who looked as sweet as a cherub in it.
"O Kitty, you are a wonderful creature!" She pinched Celia's chin, being in the mood now to think her very winning and lovely--fit hereafter to be an eternal cherub, and if it were not doctrinally wrong to say so, hardly more in need of salvation than a squirrel.
You are a cargo at sea, and the "cherub that sits up aloft" has Davy Jones's street and number by heart.
When my father returned from Milan, he found playing with me in the hall of our villa a child fairer than pictured cherub --a creature who seemed to shed radiance from her looks and whose form and motions were lighter than the chamois of the hills.
Some are adorned with skull and cross-bones, and this grizzly decoration is frequently coupled with a cherub's head.