chestnut blight


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Related to chestnut blight: Dutch elm disease

chestnut blight

n.
A disease of chestnut trees caused by a fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica) that is especially destructive to the American chestnut, characterized by cankers that kill the branches and trunk.

chest′nut blight`



n.
a disease of chestnut trees caused by a fungus, Endothia parasitica, characterized by bark lesions that eventually girdle the trunk and kill the tree.
[1905–10, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chestnut blight - a disease of American chestnut trees
blight - any plant disease resulting in withering without rotting
References in periodicals archive ?
But indiscriminate logging and the introduction of chestnut blight destroyed almost all of these trees.
Chestnut blight ravaged the American chestnut throughout the early 20th century, according to the American Chestnut Foundation.
Sweet chestnut blight is a fungus which infects and kills chestnut trees which was accidentally introduced from Asia.
Sweet chestnut blight is a fungus which infects and kills chestnut trees and was accidentally introduced from Asia.
The classic example of a nightmarish result is the chestnut blight, a fungal disease from Asia that arrived in the early 20th century and proceeded to erase the American chestnut tree as the dominant hardwood species of the Eastern deciduous forest.
To compare presence of flowering trees and chestnut blight cankered trees by seedling type and ECM morphological categories, a Pearson's Chi-Square ([X.sup.2]) was used.
Heterokaryon formation and parasexual recombination between vegetatively incompatible lineages in a population of the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica.
Chestnut blight fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica) was first identified in Brooklyn, NY in 1904.
foresters from the American Chestnut Foundation to plant seedlings they hope will be the first in more than a century to withstand an invasive fungus known as the chestnut blight.
Chinesechestnut has been introduced into many countries due to itsbest adaptability for good cold hardiness and adequate tolerance to chestnut blight (Bounous and Marinoni 2005).
Once a common sight, reigning over 200 million acres of eastern woodlands from Maine to Florida, the American chestnut tree disappeared from this area during the first half of the 20th century because of a lethal fungus infestation known as the chestnut blight. A late-flowering, reliable, and productive tree, unaffected by seasonal frosts, the American chestnut tree had been an essential component of the entire Eastern ecosystem and was the single most important food source for a wide variety of wildlife from bears to birds.