chestnut oak


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to chestnut oak: chinkapin oak, black oak, American chestnut, pin oak, swamp chestnut oak

chestnut oak

n.
A deciduous oak tree (Quercus montana syn. Q. prinus) of eastern North America having deeply ridged bark and shallowly lobed leaves that resemble those of the American chestnut.

chest′nut oak`


n.
any of several North American oaks, as Quercus prinus, having serrate or dentate leaves resembling those of the chestnut.
[1695–1705, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chestnut oak - an oak having leaves resembling those of chestnut treeschestnut oak - an oak having leaves resembling those of chestnut trees
oak tree, oak - a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves; "great oaks grow from little acorns"
Quercus michauxii, swamp chestnut oak - medium to large deciduous tree of moist areas of southeastern United States similar to the basket oak
chinkapin oak, chinquapin oak, Quercus muehlenbergii, yellow chestnut oak - medium-sized deciduous tree of the eastern United States that yields a strong durable wood
basket oak, cow oak, Quercus montana, Quercus prinus - medium to large deciduous tree of the eastern United States; its durable wood is used as timber or split and woven into baskets or chair seats
dwarf chinkapin oak, dwarf chinquapin oak, dwarf oak, Quercus prinoides - deciduous shrubby tree of northeastern and central United States having a sweet edible nut and often forming dense thickets
References in periodicals archive ?
The Garden State's Big Tree Water Quality Project materialized when officials with the Mercer County Soil Conservation District beard of a huge old swamp chestnut oak facing developer-imposed demolition.
The biggest crowns of all are the forests-by-themselves canopies of a southern red oak (156 feet) in Thomaston, Georgia; a swamp chestnut oak (Quercus michauxii) (148 feet) in Fayette County, Alabama; and the co-champion live oak (140 feet) in Waycross, Georgia.
Black Cherry White Oak Sumac Serbian Spruce Slippery Elm Hawthorn Japanese Maple Chestnut Yellow Wood White Ash Box Elder Stag Horn Chestnut Oak London Plane Grey Birch Paper Birch Red Horse Hickory Honey Locust Hackberry
Traps were set in areas of mature, mixed oak-hickory-pine forests containing predominantly hardwoods such as red oak, chestnut oak, white oak, sweet gum, sycamore, various hickory species, and loblolly pine.
If I've got something like a chestnut oak where it forms kind of triangular wedges running up and down the tree, those wedges will be really deep if the tree is old, because it's just been putting on layer after layer of bark.
The champion yellow buckeye, black cherry, and chestnut oak are all a few inches thicker and only 20 feet to 30 feet shorter than the hemlock.
In fact, after a chestnut oak in Connecticut, it was the second tree ever to be officially nominated for national champion status.
On some sites, only the more rugged species that resist drought and exposure--like pitch pine, chestnut oak, and scarlet oak--are able to coexist with the hardy Table Mountain pine.
After Connecticut's chestnut oak (Quercus prinus), the second tree crowned was the white oak (Quercus alba) of Wye Mills, Maryland, nominated, of course, by Fred Besley.
Black Cherry Crabapple Red Oak White Oak Chestnut Oak London Plane Red Mulberry Grey Birch Paper Birch Red Horse Chestnut Yellow Wood White Ash Catalpa Box Elder Weeping Willow Stag Horn Sumac Juniper Serbian Spruce Hemlock Slippery Elm Ginkgo Hawthorn Silver Maple Japanese Maple Hickory Redbud Dogwood Honey Locust Sweetgum Hackberry
In addition to those mentioned above, these include such well-known trees as quaking aspen, boxelder, northern catalpa, American holly, chestnut oak, and saguaro.
Hemlock Cottonwood Chestnut Oak Purple Ash Persimmon Silver Maple Hickory Pecan Hackberry Box Elder Red Mulberry Serbian Spruce Slippery Elm Juniper Japanese Maple Yellowwood Red Maple Honeylocust