chicken yard


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chicken yard - an enclosed yard for keeping poultrychicken yard - an enclosed yard for keeping poultry
yard - an enclosure for animals (as chicken or livestock)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Being city dwellers, we did consider seeding the next-door chicken yard with tablets of Melatonin, hoping the chickens would slurp it up with their grain and conk out.
Originally, we had a wire fence dividing the bee yard from the chicken yard but we eventually took it down.
"He actually loves spending time out here in the chicken yard with his flock," Smith said."He's able to move around in it, sit upright, and he eats a ton.
For 210,000 forints ($750; 690 euros) a day, a prospective renter gets seven guesthouses that sleep 39 people, four streets, a bus stop, a barn, a chicken yard, six horses, two cows, three sheep and 10 acres of farmland -- along with the possibility of temporarily being named deputy mayor.
I moved the birds into the chicken yard, and they started exploring their Oklahoma pasture.
Karp is the raccoon in the chicken yard" (103), Walker is at first alarmed by her incoherence, but she then realizes a "code" is involved.
Her chicken yard is protected by an old block wall that remains from a building that once stood at the corner of the property.
Between the House and the Chicken Yard: The Masks of Flannery O'Connor is an ongong recommendation for any college-level holding strong in the works and analysis of Flannery O'Connor offering an in-depth critical study of her spiritual.
Between the House and the Chicken Yard: The Masks of Flannery O'Connor is an ongoing recommendation for any college-level holding strong in the works and analysis of Flannery O'Connor, offering an in-depth critical study of her spiritual, Southern and intellectual roots.
Flannery O'Connor once said there would never be a biography written about her because no one would want to read about a life that was lived between the house and the chicken yard. As it turns out, that life makes for quite an interesting subject, when the person feeding the chickens is also the author of Wise Blood.
Denied her freedom, she dies, but not before laying three eggs, which are placed in the chicken yard. The hatchlings, two boys and a girl, are continually harassed because they do not look like chickens.