chicken-hearted

(redirected from chicken-heartedness)

chick·en-heart·ed

(chĭk′ən-här′tĭd)
adj.
Lacking courage; cowardly.

chick′en·heart′ed·ness n.

chicken-hearted

or

chicken-livered

adj
easily frightened; cowardly
ˌchicken-ˈheartedly adv
ˌchicken-ˈheartedness n

chick′en-heart`ed



adj.
fearful; cowardly.
[1675–85, Amer.]
Translations

chicken-hearted

[ˈtʃɪkɪnˌhɑːtɪd] ADJcobarde, gallina

chicken

(ˈtʃikin) noun
1. a young bird, especially a young hen. She keeps chickens.
2. its flesh used as food. a plate of fried chicken.
3. (slang.) a coward.
ˌchicken-ˈhearted adjective
cowardly.
ˈchicken-pox noun
an infectious disease with fever and red itchy spots.
chicken out
to avoid doing something because of cowardice. He chickened out at the last minute.
References in classic literature ?
This chicken-heartedness, as he dubbed it, disgusted Martin, who consequently took a satisfaction in compelling the boy to assist him actively whenever there were cattle to be dehorned, wire rings to be pushed through bunches of pigs' snouts, calves to be delivered by force, young stuff to be castrated or butchering to be done.
Cat Thief, the Breeders' Cup Classic upsetter, ``wimped on me,'' said jockey Pat Day, when he lost close decisions in several big 3-year-old races in 1999 and established his reputation for chicken-heartedness.