chieftain

(redirected from chieftainships)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

chief·tain

 (chēf′tən)
n.
The leader or head of a group, especially of a clan or tribe.

[Middle English cheftain, from Old French chevetain, from Late Latin capitāneus, from Latin caput, head; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

chief′tain·cy n.
chief′tain·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chieftain

(ˈtʃiːftən; -tɪn)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the head or leader of a tribe or clan
2. the chief of a group of people
[C14: from Old French chevetaine, from Late Latin capitāneus commander; see captain]
ˈchieftaincy, ˈchieftainˌship n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chief•tain

(ˈtʃif tən)

n.
1. the chief of a clan or a tribe.
2. a leader of a group, band, etc.: the robbers' chieftain.
[1275–1325; Middle English cheftayne, variant of chevetaine < Old French < Late Latin capitāneus captain]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chieftain - the leader of a group of people; "a captain of industry"
leader - a person who rules or guides or inspires others
2.chieftain - the head of a tribe or clanchieftain - the head of a tribe or clan    
leader - a person who rules or guides or inspires others
Indian chief, Indian chieftain - the leader of a group of Native Americans
pendragon - the supreme war chief of the ancient Britons
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

chieftain

noun
One who is highest in rank or authority:
Slang: honcho.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
زَعيمُ القَبيلَه
náčelník
høvding
törzsfõnök
höfîingi
náčelník
kabile reisi

chieftain

[ˈtʃiːftən] Njefe/a m/f, cacique m (LAm)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

chieftain

[ˈtʃiːftən] nchef m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

chieftain

n (of tribe)Häuptling m; (of clan)Oberhaupt nt, → Älteste(r) m; (of robber band)Hauptmann m; the village chieftainder Dorfälteste
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

chieftain

[ˈtʃiːftən] ncapo tribù
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

chief

(tʃiːf) adjective
greatest in importance etc. the chief cause of disease.
noun
the head of a clan or tribe, or a department, business etc.
ˈchiefly adverb
mainly. She became ill chiefly because she did not eat enough.
ˌchief eˈxecutive ˌofficer noun
(also CEO) the president of a large company.
ˈchieftain (-tən) noun
the head of a clan, tribe etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
To him who can win it, it shall be, and with it the chieftainship of the People of the Axe."
But suddenly Umslopogaas stood up, looking at him over the top of his war shield, and crying, "Here is one, O Jikiza, who will do battle with you for the axe Groan-Maker and for the chieftainship that is to him who holds the axe."
The most persistent was Du-seen, a huge warrior of whom my father stood in considerable fear, since it was quite possible that Du-seen could wrest from him his chieftainship of the Galus.
Speaking at the annual council of traditional leaders' meeting here on Monday, Geingob said communities cannot suddenly want to establish distinct traditional communities and chieftainships, premised on personal motives, preference and ambitions, after there had been peace under one traditional leadership for years.
Governance in each of these entities had evolved over centuries of trial and error and ranged from monarchies to chieftainships. The prevailing social order was maintained largely by consensus rather than confrontational debate.