childness

Related to childness: childishness, unintentionally

childness

(ˈtʃaɪldnəs)
n
the nature or character of a child
References in periodicals archive ?
Childness in Modern Horror Cinema," Max Bledstein intersperses his
Furthermore, although not all the essays here contained engage on this proposal, the editors favor the term "childness" over "childlike" and "childish" "to suggest both that the child is always defined through a kind of elusive quiddity, a spectral essence" (15-16).
Childness and the Writings of the German Past: Tropes of Childhood in Contemporary German Literature
Perhaps" books written for children (as distinct from young adult literature), carry inherently a multiplicity of images or what Hollindale (1997) calls' 'signs 'of childness '--the quality of being a child....
Milne, who include children in their readers, are recalled in detail for reassessment of their childness. My recollection of Humpty Dumpty is given the Derrida treatment to reveal what is nonsense.
Cardinal James Gibbons, the senior Roman Catholic prelate in the United States, who also wanted universal military training, stated in words reminiscent of a statement made by Progressive philosopher William James, who wanted to "get the childness knocked out of" young conscripts, "[univeral military training will] instill into them the spirit of obedience to lawful authority, a virtue too often disregarded in our land of freedom.
In line with such scholarship, Rutter's book uncovers multiple concepts of childhood in early modern and contemporary culture through her investigation of "childness" (xvii) and the importance of "look[ing] like a child" (xvi).
The ages of his children in 1694--16, 18, and 19--together with the age of the dedicatee of the 1695 manuscript suggest that it was not these individuals whose childness he addressed, but that he drew on the idea of an association between children and brief narrative that was in circulation at the time.
As Christie Barron states, "It appears that violent youths fall between the protectionist realm of 'childness' and the rights discourse of 'adultness' and [are] therefore disentitled to the securities afforded to either" (2000, p.38).
Such an example would be Peter Hollindale's Signs of Childness in Children's Books, (7) which opens with the claim to be a `clarification' of the meanings that are brought into play when the word `child' is employed.
"The Feeling and Texture of Childness." Rev, of Bronzeville Boys and Girls, by Gwendolyn Brooks.
We are, in a sense, all the children of our society, if we define childness in the sense of a continuing need to learn.