chiliad

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chil·i·ad

 (kĭl′ē-ăd′, -əd)
n.
1. A group that contains 1,000 elements.
2. One thousand years; a millennium.

[Late Latin chīlias, chīliad-, from Greek khīlias, from khīlioi, thousand; see gheslo- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chiliad

(ˈkɪlɪˌæd)
n
1. (Mathematics) a group of one thousand
2. (Units) one thousand years
[C16: from Greek khilias, from khilioi a thousand]
ˌchiliˈadal, ˌchiliˈadic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chil•i•ad

(ˈkɪl iˌæd)

n.
1. a group of 1000.
2. a period of 1000 years.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin chīliad-, s. of chīlias < Greek, derivative of chilioi 1000; see -ad1]
chil`i•ad′al, chil`i•ad′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Chiliad

 a group of 1,000 things or years.
Examples: chiliad of cross fortunes, 1598; of years before Christ, 1876.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chiliad - the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100
large integer - an integer equal to or greater than ten
millenary - a sum or aggregate of one thousand (especially one thousand years)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This should hardly be surprising given the vehement antihumanism of Ledesma, who found 36 editions of Erasmus in his purge, 12 of them being the Chiliads. Like Spanish Hours and Scripture, Erasmus continued to be widely popular in Mexico despite the efforts to ban the vast majority of his works.
Troy--me Ten Thousand under Xenophon--Cleopatra--Theodora of Byzantium, too--all these adventures become, through the chiliads, as intelligible and united as the parts of a single melody.'