chiming


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chime 1

 (chīm)
n.
1. An apparatus for striking a bell or set of bells to produce a musical sound.
2. often chimes Music A set of tuned bells used as an orchestral instrument.
3. A single bell, as in the mechanism of a clock.
4. The sound produced by or as if by a bell or bells.
5. Agreement; accord: a flawless chime of romance and reality.
v. chimed, chim·ing, chimes
v.intr.
1.
a. To sound with a harmonious ring when struck.
b. To make a musical sound by striking a bell or set of bells.
2. To be in agreement or accord: harmonize: Their views chimed with ours. The seafood and wine chimed perfectly.
v.tr.
1. To produce (music) by striking bells.
2. To strike (a bell) to produce music.
3.
a. To signal or make known by chiming: The clock chimed noon.
b. To call, send, or welcome by chiming.
4. To repeat insistently.
Phrasal Verb:
chime in
1. To interrupt the speech of others, especially with an unwanted opinion.
2. To join in harmoniously.
3. To go together harmoniously; agree.

[From Middle English chimbe (belle), from Old French, variant of cimble, cymbal, from Latin cymbalum; see cymbal.]

chim′er n.

chime 2

 (chīm)
n.
The rim of a cask.

[Middle English chimb, from Old English cim-, cimb- (in cimstānas, bases of a pillar, and cimbing, jointing); see gembh- in Indo-European roots.]
Translations

chiming

[ˈtʃaɪmɪŋ]
A. ADJ chiming clockreloj m de carillón
B. N [of church bells] → repiqueteo m; [of clock] → campanadas fpl
References in classic literature ?
His wife was keenly interested in everything he said, laying down her fork the better to listen, chiming in, taking the words out of his mouth.
But the real remained,--the real, like the flat, bare, oozy tide-mud, when the blue sparkling wave, with all its company of gliding boats and white-winged ships, its music of oars and chiming waters, has gone down, and there it lies, flat, slimy, bare,--exceedingly real.
I thought I perceived that Miss Lavinia would have uncommon satisfaction in superintending two young lovers, like Dora and me; and that Miss Clarissa would have hardly less satisfaction in seeing her superintend us, and in chiming in with her own particular department of the subject whenever that impulse was strong upon her.
I was to follow on foot as speedily as might be, and it was with a high heart that I strode along the sunset lanes, hearing for some time the chiming of her bell in front of me, till she had wheeled it quite out of hearing, and it was lost in the distance.
And now, Sir Cedric,'' he said, ``my ears are chiming vespers with the strength of your good wine permit us another pledge to the welfare of the Lady Rowena, and indulge us with liberty to pass to our repose.