chimurenga


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chimurenga

Zimbabwean political protest music of the 1970s.
References in periodicals archive ?
John's writing has been published in The Economist, The Guardian, Per Contra, Hazlitt, ZAM Magazine, Evergreen Review, and Chimurenga's The Chronic.
Two years later, seven China- trained fighters of the Zimbabwean Af- rican National Liberation Army staged a guerilla raid that was later identified as the opening battle of Zimbabwe's Second Chimurenga War, which saw the over- throw of white minority rule in the coun- try and the ascent of the Mao-influenced Robert Mugabe.
Two years later, seven China-trained fighters of the Zimbabwean African National Liberation Army staged a guerilla raid that was later identified as the opening battle of Zimbabwe's Second Chimurenga War, which saw the overthrow of white minority rule in the country and the ascent of the Mao-influenced Robert Mugabe.
and institutions like Chimurenga and Kachifo that they were now collaborating with.
The brave soldiers' ultimate sacrifice happened in the midst of the regional turmoil of the Zimbabwean Chimurenga war.
It is part of a genre dubbed "Chimurenga," after the Shona term for the liberation war against the white minority government in the 1970s.
The names of the streets in the shantytown invoke important personalities in the history of Zimbabwe, like Chimurenga Street and Mzilikazi Road.
The second presentation discusses the Third Chimurenga, articulating the achievements attained and the challenges faced by female beneficiaries of A1 farms in selected districts of the Midlands Province.
Thomas Mapfumo is well known in association with the chimurenga music, a type of music that was associated with the liberation struggle in Zimbabwe's war of independence, was a tool and act of resistance (Bere; Chikowero) or "songs that won the liberation struggle" (Pongweni).
The human face of Chimurenga II." In Orality and Cultural Identities in Zimbabwe, edited by T.
The military campaign to push the British out of Zimbabwe, known as the Chimurenga or the war of liberation, started in May 1896 out of the initiative of the Ndebele people another important ethnic group in Zimbabwe.