chinquapin

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Related to chinquapins: American Chinquapin

chin·qua·pin

or chin·ka·pin  (chĭng′kə-pĭn′)
n.
1. A chestnut (Castanea pumila) of eastern North America that grows as a shrub or small tree.
2. Any of several evergreen trees or shrubs of the family Fagaceae, including species in the genera Chrysolepis of western North America and Castanopsis of East and Southeast Asia.
3. The edible nut of any of these plants.

[Of Algonquian origin; akin to Virginia Algonquin chechinkamin, chestnut.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chinquapin

(ˈtʃɪŋkəpɪn) ,

chincapin

or

chinkapin

n
1. (Plants) a dwarf chestnut tree, Castanea pumila, of the eastern US, yielding edible nuts
2. (Plants) Also called: giant chinquapin a large evergreen fagaceous tree, Castanopsis chrysophylla, of W North America
3. (Plants) the nut of either of these trees
[C17: of Algonquian origin; compare Algonquian chechinkamin chestnut]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chin•qua•pin

(ˈtʃɪŋ kə pɪn)

n.
1. a shrubby chestnut, Castanea pumila, of the southeastern U.S., having toothed, oblong leaves and small edible nuts.
2. a Pacific coast evergreen tree, Castanopsis chrysophylla, of the beech family, having deeply furrowed bark, dark green lance-shaped leaves, and inedible nuts.
3. the nut of either of these trees.
[1605–15, Amer.; < Virginia Algonquian (E sp.) chechinquamins]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chinquapin - shrubby tree closely related to the Allegheny chinkapin but with larger leaveschinquapin - shrubby tree closely related to the Allegheny chinkapin but with larger leaves; southern midwestern United States
chincapin, chinkapin, chinquapin - small nut of either of two small chestnut trees of the southern United States; resembles a hazelnut
Castanea, genus Castanea - chestnuts; chinkapins
chestnut tree, chestnut - any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
2.chinquapin - shrubby chestnut tree of southeastern United States having small edible nutschinquapin - shrubby chestnut tree of southeastern United States having small edible nuts
chincapin, chinkapin, chinquapin - small nut of either of two small chestnut trees of the southern United States; resembles a hazelnut
Castanea, genus Castanea - chestnuts; chinkapins
chestnut tree, chestnut - any of several attractive deciduous trees yellow-brown in autumn; yield a hard wood and edible nuts in a prickly bur
3.chinquapin - small nut of either of two small chestnut trees of the southern United States; resembles a hazelnut
edible nut - a hard-shelled seed consisting of an edible kernel or meat enclosed in a woody or leathery shell
Allegheny chinkapin, Castanea pumila, dwarf chestnut, eastern chinquapin, chinquapin - shrubby chestnut tree of southeastern United States having small edible nuts
Castanea ozarkensis, chinquapin, Ozark chinkapin, Ozark chinquapin - shrubby tree closely related to the Allegheny chinkapin but with larger leaves; southern midwestern United States
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
has lost 86 percent of its traditional apple varieties, and old staples such as chestnuts and chinquapins are now too rare to be marketed.
Since then he has searched--and inspired others to search--high and low, hill and hollow throughout the Ozarks to find mature Ozark chinquapins and gather their nuts to preserve the trees genetic diversity.
She points out the Pacific yew and the chinquapins that stand solo, fighting for their little piece of the forest.
Two members of the group found in the western United States (chinquapins) are sometimes assigned to the genus Chrysolepis (e.g., Kubitzki, 1993).