chionodoxa


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Related to chionodoxa: Puschkinia

chi·on·o·dox·a

 (kī′ə-nō-dŏk′sə, kī-ŏn′ə-)
[New Latin Chionodoxa, genus name : Greek khiōn, khion-, snow; see ghei- in Indo-European roots + Greek doxa, glory; see doxology.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chionodoxa

(kaɪˌɒnəˈdɒksə)
n
(Plants) any plant of the liliaceous genus Chionodoxa, of S Europe and W Asia. See glory-of-the-snow
[C19: New Latin, from Greek khiōn snow + doxa glory]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Growing to a height of 20cm, it will naturalise from year to year and is a good partner for Chionodoxa forbesii 'Blue Giant' (height 15cm), where the narcissi rise above the bed of blue.
Growing to 20cm, it will naturalise from year to year and is a good partner for Chionodoxa forbesii 'Blue Giant' (15cm).
| Keep planting bulbs for next spring - try small easy ones like Chionodoxa (Glory of the Soil) and crocus - easy because you don't have to dig down far.
CHIONODOXA LUCILIAE Boiss.--CW; MWL; Rare but locally abundant; naturalized; C = 0; BSUH 19745.
To give winter-flowering heathers a new life in spring, underplant with miniature bulbs such as narcissi, crocus, chionodoxa, snowdrops and irises.
Celandines and anemones emerge, with masses of little blue bulbs, chionodoxa, scillas and muscari.
Celandines and anemones emerge, accompanied by masses of little blue bulbs, chionodoxa, scillas and muscari.
KE| planting bulbs for next spring - try easy ones like chionodoxa and crocus - easy because you don't have to dig down far.
I will leave you to make your selections from the minor bulbs such as Snowdrops, Scillas, Muscari, Chionodoxa. But be sure to purchase at least 25 (better 100 of each), and plant them in groups of 13 or more.
Chionodoxa, Scilla, Puschkinia and Muscari are all very hardy and have miniature flowers mostly in shades of blue and white.
Some of my favorites are blue and white glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa) and yellow winter aconites (Eranthis).
The collection comprises 45 Oxalis Deppei Iron Cross, 35 Chionodoxa Luciliae, 10 Narcissus Minature Yellow, and 10 Tulip Daystemon Tarda.