chirality


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chi·ral·i·ty

 (kī-răl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The aspect of a structure or property, such as the configuration of a molecule or the spin of a particle, that renders that structure or property distinguishable from its mirror image or symmetrical opposite. Also called handedness.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chirality

(kaɪˈrælɪtɪ)
n
(Chemistry) the configuration or handedness (left or right) of an asymmetric, optically active chemical compound. Also called: dissymmetry
[C19: from Greek kheir hand + -al1 + -ity]
ˈchiral adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
chiralité
chiralità
aynallıkkirallik
References in periodicals archive ?
But, for reasons that are still unknown, living systems tend to prefer one type of handedness - or chirality - over the other.
The scientists observed what's known as chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions in an exquisitely designed and synthesized artificial material with reversible electrical properties.
On the other hand, chiral ligands increase the chirality [17] of the complexes and improve the pharmacological behavior of metal complexes.
Kaplan delivered the Salam Memorial Lecture on 'The Peculiar Story of Chirality'.
But such eccentric obsessions have a charming peculiarity; likewise, Roos discusses fish, shells and spiders, the chirality (or 'handedness') of snails, petrified oysters, remedies made of butter of antimony and crayfish eyes, sea lilies and sea unicorns.
This includes organoleptic, microbial, gas chromatography, mass specrometry, NO FTIR, chirality, isotopic, and heavy metal testing.
According to the neurosurgeon, 'Sinistral and Dextral are two scientific types of handedness (chirality) or (relative direction) in people''.
The four refilled CLCs are labelled as RCLC-red, RCLC-green, LCLC-red, and LCLC-green, in which "R" and "L" in front of CLC mean right- and left-handednesses of chirality, respectively, and "red" and "green" in the labels are the reflection bands at red and green regions, respectively.
The effect of chirality on the polarization and intensity of the radiation from a dipole is discussed.
Other implications of their geometrical chirality, in terms of mechanical properties, have been studied, like enhanced compressive strength capabilities, shear stiffness compared to classical centrosymmetric honeycomb configurations, or a synclastic curvature feature [1, 4].
This direction of rotation is termed as the chirality and represented in the form of sum of two vectors (n, m), as shown in Equation (1), representing two different directions.
In contrast, the intracellular model suggests that LR symmetry breaking occurs early in development, within the first few embryonic cleavages, and depends on cytoskeletal chirality [4].