chirality


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chi·ral·i·ty

 (kī-răl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The aspect of a structure or property, such as the configuration of a molecule or the spin of a particle, that renders that structure or property distinguishable from its mirror image or symmetrical opposite. Also called handedness.

chirality

(kaɪˈrælɪtɪ)
n
(Chemistry) the configuration or handedness (left or right) of an asymmetric, optically active chemical compound. Also called: dissymmetry
[C19: from Greek kheir hand + -al1 + -ity]
ˈchiral adj
Translations
chiralité
chiralità
aynallıkkirallik
References in periodicals archive ?
Philae includes experiments to test a molecule's symmetrical construction, or chirality.
Efficient applications of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) in electronic and photovoltaic devices require a selective geometry, in particular, chirality of nanotubes, which is still a great challenge for synthetic techniques.
The synthesis and characterization of optically active polymers is a topic of growing interest due to the abundant and multifaceted architecture of macromolecular chirality as compared with that of small molecules [1].
We will explore how the sense of helical chirality of these molecules can be switched (M to P) just with light.
The pitch or angle of orientation of this spiral is equal to the light's wavelength, and the chirality depends on whether the spiral sweeps clockwise or counterclockwise as the light wave moves along its path.
It is important to note that the small tide-forming forces of the Moon and Sun create the chirality (dissymmetry) of plants.
6) Finally, the properties of SWNT are strongly chirality dependent, creating the opportunity for tuneable performance once chirality-selective synthesis and/or separation are realized on a practical scale.
We need to show a change of chirality over time," states Tracey Thaler, a graduate student at the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
The influences of the chirality on the scattering are investigated.
Chirality refers to the handedness of an image or phenomenon, which is not identical to the mirror image of its counterpart, much as the right and left hands are similar in structure but are opposites and thus not the same.
Other chapters address chirality as an environmental forensics tool, sources and effects of contaminant emissions in urban areas, problems of POPs in the developing world, and the contamination of indoor environments with POPs.