chitlings


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chit·lins

or chit·lings  (chĭt′lĭnz)
pl.n.
Variants of chitterlings.

chit·ter·lings

also chit·lins or chit·lings  (chĭt′lĭnz)
pl.n.
The small intestines of pigs, especially when cooked and eaten as food.

[From Middle English chiterling, probably diminutive of Old English *cieter, intestines.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chit•ter•lings

or

chit•lings

(ˈtʃɪt lɪnz, -lɪŋz)

n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
the small intestine of swine, esp. when prepared as food.
[1250–1300; Middle English cheterling; akin to German Kutteln in same sense]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Chitlins

Fried hog intestines.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chitlings - small intestines of hogs prepared as food
organs, variety meat - edible viscera of a butchered animal
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

chitlings

[ˈtʃɪtlɪŋz] NPL chitlins [ˈtʃɪtlɪnz] NPL chitterlings [ˈtʃɪtəlɪŋz] NPLmenudos mpl de cerdo (comestibles)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
The conversation proceeded no farther at this time, for the Jew had returned home accompanied by Miss Betsy, and a gentleman whom Oliver had never seen before, but who was accosted by the Dodger as Tom Chitling; and who, having lingered on the stairs to exchange a few gallantries with the lady, now made his appearance.
Chitling was older in years than the Dodger: having perhaps numbered eighteen winters; but there was a degree of deference in his deportment towards that young gentleman which seemed to indicate that he felt himself conscious of a slight inferiority in point of genius and professional aquirements.
'Who's that?' inquired Tom Chitling, casting a contemptuous look at Oliver.