chlamydia

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Related to chlamydiae: Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlorobi

chla·myd·i·a

 (klə-mĭd′ē-ə)
n. pl. chla·myd·i·ae (-ē-ē′)
1. Any of various gram-negative, coccoid bacteria of the genus Chlamydia, especially C. psittaci and C. trachomatis, that are pathogenic to humans and other animals, causing infections such as conjunctivitis in cattle and sheep and trachoma, urethritis, and pneumonia in humans.
2. Any of several common, often asymptomatic, sexually transmitted diseases caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.

[New Latin, genus name, from Latin chlamys, chlamyd-, mantle (in reference to the reticulate form, resembling a mantle around the host cell's nucleus, that the bacterium assumes within the host's cytoplasm); see chlamys.]

chla·myd′i·al adj.

chlamydia

(kləˈmɪdɪə)
n, pl -midiae (-ˈmɪdɪiː)
(Microbiology) any Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Chlamydia, which are obligate intracellular parasites and are responsible for such diseases as trachoma, psittacosis, and some sexually transmitted diseases
[C20: New Latin, from Greek khlamus mantle + -ia]

chla•myd•i•a

(kləˈmɪd i ə)

n., pl. -myd•i•ae (-ˈmɪd iˌi)
1. any coccoid rickettsia of the genus Chlamydia, parasitic in birds and mammals, including humans, and causing various infections.
2. a widespread, often asymptomatic sexually transmitted disease caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, a major cause of nongonococcal urethritis in men and pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy in women.
[< New Latin (1945) < Greek chlamyd-, s. of chlamýs chlamys]

chlamydia

A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacterium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chlamydia - a sexually transmitted infection caused by bacteria of the genus Chlamydia
sexually transmitted disease, social disease, STD, VD, venereal disease, venereal infection, Venus's curse, Cupid's disease, Cupid's itch, dose - a communicable infection transmitted by sexual intercourse or genital contact
2.chlamydia - coccoid rickettsia infesting birds and mammals; cause infections of eyes and lungs and genitourinary tract
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Chlamydia - type genus of the family Chlamydiaceae: disease-causing parasites
C. psittaci, Chlamydia psittaci - bacteria responsible for the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia
C. trachomatis, Chlamydia trachomatis - bacteria responsible for the sexually transmitted diseases chlamydia and lymphogranuloma venereum
Translations
ChlamydieChlamydien
chlamydia
klamüüdia
klamydia
chlamydia
chlamydia
クラミジア
klamydia
chlamydie
chlamydia
klamidya

chlamydia

[klæmˈɪdɪə] Nclamidiaf

chla·myd·i·a

n. clamidia, enfermedad transmitida por el género Chlamydia Trachomatis, generador asintomático que causa varias enfermedades, entre ellas tracoma, uretritis, y proctitis.

chlamydia

n clamidia
References in periodicals archive ?
Chlamydiae comprises 11 species that are pathogenic.
Syphilis, blennorragie, verrues gAaAaAeA@nitales, chlamydiae, Sida.
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Chlamydiae are small Gram-negative bacteria that preferentially infect columnar epithelial cells.
Novel chlamydiae in whiteflies and scale insects: endosymbionts 'Candidatus Fritschea bemisiae' strain Falk and 'Candidatus Fritschea eriococci' strain Elm.
This survey also suggests that the carriage rate of C psittaci is low in raptors in Oregon wild bird rehabilitation centers, and that care must be taken in the design of PCR primers for phylum Chlamydiae such that colonization by insect endosymbionts is not mistaken for an infection by known chlamydial pathogens.
The risk associated with diseases causing discharges (Gonorrhea, chlamydiae infection, trichomonas infection and bacterial infections) is four fold.
It often acts together with other infectious agents, like Chlamydiae, Mycoplasmae and viruses.
While these bacteria have been known for more than a decade to protect infected cells from apoptosis, the lack of tools for genetic manipulation of chlamydiae significantly hampered the investigation of underlying molecular mechanisms and their role during infection.
The Bacteroidetes Spirochaetes Tenericutes (Mollicutes) Acidobacteria Fibrobacteres Fusobacteria Dictyoglomi Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Verrucomicrobia Chlamydiae and Planctomycetes.