ornithosis

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Related to chlamydiosis: parrot fever, Avian chlamydiosis

or·ni·tho·sis

 (ôr′nə-thō′sĭs)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ornithosis

(ˌɔːnɪˈθəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Veterinary Science) a disease identical to psittacosis that occurs in birds other than parrots and can be transmitted to man
2. (Medicine) a disease identical to psittacosis that occurs in birds other than parrots and can be transmitted to man
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ornithosis

psittacosis, partieularly in birds other than those of the parrot family.
See also: Birds
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ornithosis - an atypical pneumonia caused by a rickettsia microorganism and transmitted to humans from infected birds
atypical pneumonia, mycoplasmal pneumonia, primary atypical pneumonia - an acute respiratory disease marked by high fever and coughing; caused by mycoplasma; primarily affecting children and young adults
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood SAA levels can indicate inflammatory conditions such as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) and other infectious diseases such as caliciviral infection, chlamydiosis, leukemia, and infectious immunodeficiency since it increases by 10- to 50-fold(TIZARd, 2013b).
Key words: Chlamydia psittaci, chlamydiosis, avian, Psittaciformes, Columbiformes, ompA gene, nested-PCR
Infection with this virus has also led to higher incidence of secondary infections, such as chlamydiosis and neoplasias (48).
[12.] Compendium of measures to control chlamydia psittaci infection among humans (psittacosis) and pet birds (avian chlamydiosis), 1998.
Infectious causes other than brucellosis include Neospora caninum infection, bovine viral diarrhea, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, leptospirosis, mycotic abortion, Trueperella pyogenes infection, trichomoniasis, listeriosis, chlamydiosis, and Bluetongue etc.
According to recent statistics from the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chlamydiosis is the most common reportable disease in the United States.
During the period of 2003-2013, dynamics of morbidity with urogenital chlamydiosis has been characterized by a tendency toward decrease (Figure 12).
trachomatis in the serum of the patients with urogenital chlamydiosis," BioMed Research International, vol.
However, sheep and goat suffer from numerous viral diseases, namely, foot-and-mouth disease, bluetongue disease, maedi-visna, orf, Tick-borne encephalomyelitis, peste des petits ruminants, sheep pox, and goat pox, as well as bacterial diseases, namely, blackleg, foot rot, caprine pleuropneumonia, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, Pasteurellosis, mycoplasmosis, streptococcal infections, chlamydiosis, haemophilosis, Johne's disease, listeriosis, and fleece rot [3-10].
coli infection 94 Leptospirosis 90 Rabies 87 Hantavirus infection 84 West Nile disease 80 Spotted fever, tick-borne 77 Brucellosis 74 Toxoplasmosis 71 Venezuelan equine encephalitis 68 Medium-priority value Listeriosis 65 (from percentile 0.66 Anthrax 61 to percentile 0.33) Campylobacteriosis 58 Zoonotic tuberculosis 54 Western equine encephalitis 52 Flea- and lice-borne typhus 48 Yersiniosis 43 Cysticercosis 43 Trypanosomiasis (Chagas) 39 Yellow fever 36 Low-priority value Echinococcosis 32 (from percentile 0.33 Criptosporidiosis 28 to minimum score) Chlamydiosis 28 Cat scratch disease 23 Toxocariasis 20 Leishmaniasis 16 Borreliosis 13 Trichinellosis 9 Dermatophytosis (ringworm) 6 Scabies 3 Ancylostomiasis 0 TABLE 3.
Elevated serum sCD14 levels were found in many noninfectious (Crohn's disease, SLE) or infectious (HIV, chlamydiosis) diseases [46-49].