chlorine


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Related to chlorine: Chlorine bleach

chlo·rine

 (klôr′ēn′, -ĭn)
n. Symbol Cl
A highly irritating, greenish-yellow halogen element, existing as a diatomic gas, Cl2, and capable of combining with nearly all other elements, produced principally by electrolysis of sodium chloride and used widely to disinfect water, as a bleaching agent, and in the manufacture of many important compounds including chlorates, sodium hypochlorite, and chloroform. Atomic number 17; atomic weight 35.453; freezing point -100.5°C; boiling point -34.04°C; specific gravity 1.56 (-33.6°C); valence 1, 3, 5, 7. See Periodic Table.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chlorine

(ˈklɔːriːn) or

chlorin

n
(Elements & Compounds) a toxic pungent greenish-yellow gas of the halogen group; the 15th most abundant element in the earth's crust, occurring only in the combined state, mainly in common salt: used in the manufacture of many organic chemicals, in water purification, and as a disinfectant and bleaching agent. Symbol: Cl; atomic no: 17; atomic wt: 35.4527; valency: 1, 3, 5, or 7; density: 3.214 kg/m3; relative density: 1.56; melting pt: –101.03°C; boiling pt: –33.9°C
[C19 (coined by Sir Humphrey Davy): from chloro- + -ine2, referring to its colour]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chlo•rine

(ˈklɔr in, -ɪn, ˈkloʊr-)

n.
a halogen element, a heavy, greenish yellow poisonous gas: used to purify water and to make bleaching powder and various chemicals. Symbol: Cl; at. wt.: 35.453; at. no.: 17.
[1810; < Greek chlōr(ós) yellowish green + -ine2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chlo·rine

(klôr′ēn′)
Symbol Cl A greenish-yellow, gaseous halogen element that can combine with most other elements and is found chiefly in combination with sodium as common salt. Chlorine is very poisonous, being highly irritating to the nose, throat, and lungs, and causing suffocation. It is used in purifying water, as a disinfectant and bleach, and in making many important compounds such as chloroform. Atomic number 17. See Periodic Table. See Note at chlorophyll.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chlorine - a common nonmetallic element belonging to the halogenschlorine - a common nonmetallic element belonging to the halogens; best known as a heavy yellow irritating toxic gas; used to purify water and as a bleaching agent and disinfectant; occurs naturally only as a salt (as in sea water)
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
radiochlorine - a radioactive isotope of chlorine
common salt, sodium chloride - a white crystalline solid consisting mainly of sodium chloride (NaCl)
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
halogen - any of five related nonmetallic elements (fluorine or chlorine or bromine or iodine or astatine) that are all monovalent and readily form negative ions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
كلُوركْلور كْلورين
хлор
chlór
klorklorin
kloro
kloor
kloori
klor
klór
klór
塩素
염소
chloras
hlors
clor
chlór
klor
хлор
klorklorin
คลอรีน
хлор
clo

chlorine

[ˈklɔːriːn]
A. Ncloro m
B. CPD chlorine monoxide Nmonóxido m de cloro
chlorine nitrate Nnitrato m de cloro
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

chlorine

[ˈklɔːriːn] nchlore m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

chlorine

nChlor nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

chlorine

[ˈklɔːriːn] ncloro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

chlorine

(ˈkloːriːn) noun
an element, a yellowish-green gas with a suffocating smell, used as a disinfectant etc. They put too much chlorine in the swimming-pool.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

chlorine

كلُور chlór klorin Chlor χλωρίνη cloro kloori chlore klor cloro 塩素 염소 chloor klor chlor cloro хлор klorin คลอรีน klor clo
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

chlo·rine

n. cloro, agente desinfectante y blanqueador.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chlorine

n cloro
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"Let me see--," and he went over to his medicine-bag, murmuring something about "liberated chlorine on animal-pigment-- perhaps zinc-ointment, as a temporary measure, spread thick--"
comes from public municipal water sources that are often treated with, you guessed it, chlorine. A few cities have switched over to other means of disinfecting their water supplies.
Hattersley suggests opening an outdoor window in the shower room to release the vapors and installing a water filter on the shower head to remove chlorine from bathing water.
Researchers looked at 400,000 infants born between 2001 and 2003 in Taiwan, where levels of chlorine in water are similar to the UK.
Due to the horror it caused, chlorine gas, along with other chemical agents, was outlawed by the 1925 Geneva Protocols and that was reinforced by the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1992.
Thin film composite (TFC) membranes can degrade, or noticeably lose their ability to reject salts, after 200 to 1,000 hours of exposure to a single part per million (ppm) of free chlorine. The rate of attack depends on pH and other feedwater characteristics.
Toshiba, Shibaura and Chlorine have already developed a single-wafer resist stripping system that will be integrated into the resist stripping process at Toshiba's Yokkaichi plant in April Shibaura and Chlorine plan to sell the current resist stripping system as well as the new electrolyzed sulfuric system.
The opening for the article also stated it as fact: "For the third time in a month, insurgents deployed a new and deadly tactic against Iraqi civilians today: A chemical bomb combining explosives with poisonous chlorine gas."
Scientists at North Carolina A&T State University evaluated the efficacy of chlorine dioxide alone or in combination with warm water in improving the microbiological quality of green leafy vegetables.
Magnesium limits of 0.30% require approximately 40 to 50% less chlorine than alloys with 0.10% magnesium, depending upon the raw material being used.
As water is recycled through the salt-chlorine generator, there should be little combined chlorine (the irritant that causes the unmistakable odor of a poorly maintained pool).
Properly applied, it will cleanse water in short order without raising the chlorine level or creating combined chlorine.