cholesterol

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Related to cholesterols: Cholesterine

cho·les·ter·ol

 (kə-lĕs′tə-rôl′, -rōl′)
n.
A white crystalline substance, C27H45OH, that is found in animal tissues and various foods and is important as a constituent of cell membranes and a precursor to steroid hormones. Cholesterol is normally synthesized by the liver and is transported through the bloodstream by different types of lipoproteins, two of which (HDL and LDL) are routinely measured in blood tests.

[cholester(in), former name for cholesterol (chole- + Greek stereos, solid; see ster- in Indo-European roots + -in) + -ol (so called because it was first found in gallstones).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cholesterol

(kəˈlɛstəˌrɒl)
n
(Biochemistry) a sterol found in all animal tissues, blood, bile, and animal fats: a precursor of other body steroids. A high level of cholesterol in the blood is implicated in some cases of atherosclerosis, leading to heart disease. Formula: C27H45OH. Former name: cholesterin
[C19: from chole- + Greek stereos hard, solid, so called because first observed in gallstones]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cho•les•ter•ol

(kəˈlɛs təˌroʊl, -ˌrɔl)

n.
a sterol, C27H46O, abundant in animal fats, brain and nerve tissue, meat, and eggs, that functions in the body as a membrane constituent and as a precursor of steroid hormones and bile acids: high blood levels are associated with arteriosclerosis and gallstones.
[1890–95; chole- + Greek ster(eós) solid]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cho·les·ter·ol

(kə-lĕs′tə-rôl′)
A fatty substance found in animals and plants that is a main component of cell membranes and is important in metabolism and hormone production. In vertebrate animals, cholesterol is a major component of the blood. Higher than normal amounts of cholesterol in the blood, which can occur from eating too many fatty foods, may lead to diseases of the arteries such as atherosclerosis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cholesterol

- Comes from Greek words meaning "bile, gall" and "stiff, solid," plus the ending "-ol."
See also related terms for solid.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cholesterol

A fatty substance produced and used by the body and ingested in food. High levels of certain types of cholesterol can narrow blood vessels, impairing circulation.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cholesterol - an animal sterol that is normally synthesized by the liver; the most abundant steroid in animal tissues
steroid alcohol, sterol - any of a group of natural steroid alcohols derived from plants or animals; they are waxy insoluble substances
HDL cholesterol - the cholesterol in high-density lipoproteins; the `good' cholesterol; a high level in the blood is thought to lower the risk of coronary artery disease
LDL cholesterol - the cholesterol in low-density lipoproteins; the `bad' cholesterol; a high level in the blood is thought to be related to various pathogenic conditions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
cholesterol
kolesterol
kolesteroli
kolesterol
コレステロール
콜레스테롤
kolesterol
ไขมันในเส้นเลือด
chất cholestorol

cholesterol

[kəˈlestərɒl] Ncolesterol m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cholesterol

[kəˈlɛstərɒl] ncholestérol m
high cholesterol → excès m de cholestérol
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cholesterol

nCholesterin nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cholesterol

[kəˈlɛstərɒl] ncolesterolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cholesterol

كوليسترول cholesterol kolesterol Cholesterin χοληστερίνη colesterol kolesteroli cholestérol kolesterol colesterolo コレステロール 콜레스테롤 cholesterol kolesterol cholesterol colesterol холестерин kolesterol ไขมันในเส้นเลือด kolesterol chất cholestorol 胆固醇
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

cho·les·ter·ol

n. colesterol, lípido precursor de las hormonas sexuales y corticoides adrenales, componente de las grasas y aceites animales, del tejido nervioso y de la sangre;
___ reducerreductor de ___;
high ______ alto.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cholesterol

n colesterol m; LDL (HDL, etc.) — colesterol LDL (HDL, etc.); total — colesterol total
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
What's more, the young adults in the Dutch study had low cholesterols. "Work needs to be done with a middle-aged population with cholesterols in the 220 to 280 range," says Emken.
And the fats in our foods may effect cholesterol differently than those used in the Dutch experiment.
The question is, do trans fats raise or lower your blood cholesterol? That's what Mensink and Katan tried to find out.
Twenty percent of heart attacks occur in people with cholesterols under 200.
Q: Aren't people with the highest cholesterols at greatest risk?
The role of cholesterol in heart and vascular disease is well publicized.
Another piece of the cholesterol puzzlefell into place last week with the announcement that cholesterol-reducing drugs and decreased dietary fat together not only significantly lower blood cholesterol, but also slow the spread of fatty buildup in blood vessels.
Although elevated cholesterol levelshave been tied to increased risk of heart disease for several years, the latest study is one of the first to lower blood cholesterol in patients who have had previous coronary bypass surgery.

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