chondrocranium


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Related to chondrocranium: dermatocranium, splanchnocranium, desmocranium

chon·dro·cra·ni·um

 (kŏn′drō-krā′nē-əm)
n. pl. chon·dro·cra·ni·ums or chon·dro·cra·ni·a (-nē-ə)
1. The cartilaginous cranium of an embryo before ossification.
2. A portion of the embryonic cranium forming the bones of the base of the skull and eventually undergoing ossification.

chondrocranium

(ˌkɒndrəʊˈkreɪnɪəm)
n
the cartilaginous structure that, in early development, envelops the brain
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although cranial base develops majorly from chondrocranium, it shows both neural growth, from sella upto foramen caecum, and somatic pattern of growth type.
However, in the 36 hpf embryos, there was weaker expression in the notochord for surface embryos and an increased expression in the chondrocranium. At 3 days post-fertilization (dpf), cave and surface embryos showed similar expression in the chondrocranium.
Regarding African species, Skinner (1973) described the ontogenetic and adult morphology in Trachylepis capensis skull, whereas Rao & Ramaswami (1952) described the fully formed chondrocranium and the adult osteocranium of the Asian Eutropis carinata.
It is named chondrocranium since most of its bones are made up of cartilage and ossify by the process of endochondral ossification [1].
He distinguished it from the other genera in the family Scyliorhinidae by the presence of a supraorbital crest on the chondrocranium and the lack of upper and lower labial furrows.
chondrocranium, teeth and patches of skin 20 Long Inlet, Graham 53[degrees]12'N, 16 Dec.
What we call the skull in humans was formed from a combination of the primitive brain case (chondrocranium), the sensory capsules and their underlying supports, components of the visceral skeleton (gill arches and their derivatives), and the overlying dermal bones (dermatocranium).
However, systematic deposits of calcium phosphate have also been found in chondrocranium, jaws, visceral arches, fin cartilage, claspers, neural and haemal arches (Clement, 1992).
Decomposition of beached carcasses is accompanied by erosion of the caudal fin and sloughing of the head, leaving a long bony "tail" and a small chondrocranium "head" (Scott and Scott, 1988).
The chondrocranium of the embryo was evidently damaged and foreshortened by the general compression of its snout.