chondrogenesis

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chondrogenesis

(ˌkɒndrəʊˈdʒɛnɪsɪs)
n
the growth of cartilage
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References in periodicals archive ?
* Malignant and benign bone tumors with a significant statistical difference (p<0.001) and after the exclusion of chondrogenic tumors (p<0.004).
One regenerative technique that has shown success is stem cell therapy, a non-surgical treatment capable of repairing the joint and supplying the affected joint with chondrogenic (cartilage forming) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC).
In addition to being a Center of Excellence in the Southeast, the CBB objectives include doubling the size of their hospital network; isolating and expanding mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that are capable of differentiating down adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages; adding an additional Class 6 clean room for cord blood processing; and participating in clinical research projects.
[14] While comparing younger cells and aged human-derived MSCs it has been observed that there is a decreased in proliferation rates, chondrogenic and osteogenic potential and also increased senescent features.
Molecular Validation of Chondrogenic Differentiation and Hypoxia Responsiveness of Platelet-Lysate Expanded Adipose Tissue-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.
The researchers further identified that two cell-membrane proteins, Caveolin-1 and N-Cadherin are differentially regulated during the condensation step and function as interactive forces like a Yin-Yang of chondrogenic differentiation.
For example, LIPUS promotes migration of periodontal ligament stem cells (26), osteoblasts (27), and chondrogenic progenitor cells (28).
(48) Bone marrow appears to have a higher proliferative ability, chondrogenic potential, and osteogenic potential compared to adipose tissue.
The role of factors such as Sox-9, RUNX-2, TGF-[beta], and the bone morphogenic protein in chondrogenic potential of lipomas has been discussed.
It was observed that menstrual blood-derived stem cells contained heterogeneous cell populations, expressed MSCs markers and were able to differentiate into chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic cell lineages (19).
Synovial fluid-derived MSCs present an attractive cell source because they can be harvested relatively in a minimally invasive manner from synovial fluid and retain a particularly high capacity for chondrogenic differentiation and proliferation compared with MSCs obtained from other tissues, such as bone marrow or periosteum [9, 15, 16].
Differentiation of fibroblastic cells obtained from adipose tissue could be directed towards adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages using appropriate differentiation media and supplements.