chops


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to chops: Lamb chops

chops

 (chŏps)
pl.n.
1. The jaws.
2.
a. The mouth.
b. The lower cheeks or jowls.
c. Muttonchops.
3. Slang The technical skill with which a jazz or rock musician performs.
Idiom:
bust (someone's) chops
1. To scold or insult someone.
2. To disappoint or defeat someone.
3. To hold a building contractor to the letter of an agreement.

[Possibly akin to chop. N. 3, originally in reference to the embouchure of trumpeters.]

chops

(tʃɒps)
pl n
1. the jaws or cheeks; jowls
2. the mouth
3. (Music, other) music embouchure
4. (Jazz) jazz skill
5. lick one's chops informal to anticipate with pleasure
[C16: of uncertain origin]
Translations

chops

[tʃɒps] NPL (Anat) → boca fsing, labios mpl
to lick one's chopsrelamerse, chuparse los dedos

chops

[ˈtʃɒps] npl (= jaws) [person] → mâchoire f; [animal] → babines fpl

chops

pl (of dog)Lefzen pl; (inf, of person) → Visage f (inf)
References in classic literature ?
He brought me some chops, and vegetables, and took the covers off in such a bouncing manner that I was afraid I must have given him some offence.
Nicholas suggested cold meat, but there was no cold meat--poached eggs, but there were no eggs--mutton chops, but there wasn't a mutton chop within three miles, though there had been more last week than they knew what to do with, and would be an extraordinary supply the day after tomorrow.
No sooner had they bought the chops than they scurried away like two gleeful children to cook them.
At 7 o'clock the coffee was made and the frying-pan was on the back of the stove hot and ready to cook the chops.
Her mouth opened, the saliva drooled forth, and she licked her chops with the pleasure of anticipation.
He used to marry a new wife every day, and chop off her head next morn- ing.
Do black man stop along Malaita chop 'm off tail along dog.
So you just climb out and chop firewood, and plenty of it.
I see well enough,' said the witch, 'that you can do no more today, but I will keep you yet another night, in payment for which you must tomorrow chop me a load of wood, and chop it small.
For it was the custom, as they found, whenever meat was so spoiled that it could not be used for anything else, either to can it or else to chop it up into sausage.
I'll have to chop a cord of yours now in order to make this up to you.
Bounderby (whom he just knew by sight), at lunch on chop and sherry.