chordal

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chord·al

 (kôr′dl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the strings of an instrument.
2. Relating to or consisting of a harmonic chord.
3. Giving prominence to harmonic rather than contrapuntal structure: chordal music.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chord•al

(ˈkɔr dl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or resembling a chord.
2. of or pertaining to music that is marked principally by vertical harmonic movement rather than by linear polyphony.
[1610–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.chordal - relating to or consisting of or emphasizing chords; "chordal assonance in modern music"; "chordal rather than contrapuntal music"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

chordal

adj (Mus) → Akkord-
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding "transferral" of material, the nearest that can be seen is the rhythmic transferral of some triplet subdivisions across existing textures: a few right-hand piano lines in the Pantoum are thus rhythmically arpeggiated where the manuscript had presented them chordally (notably between figures 2 and 3), while a small handful of string triplet groups are simplified to quarter-notes.
And some of the pieces he chooses have little to offer a jazz pianist - JamesBrown's Sex Machine, for example, where's he's left simply stating the vocal melody chordally on piano.
It seems that after the exposition of a work, however, all remaining sections--homophonic and polyphonic--may be accompanied chordally.
Though tonal, it is not guided by functional harmony, and the themes, though not excessively chromatic, avoid an implied pitch centre, even when chordally accompanied.