chordophone

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chordophone

(ˈkɔːdəˌfəʊn)
n
(Instruments) any musical instrument producing sounds through the vibration of strings, such as the piano, harp, violin, or guitar
ˌchordoˈphonic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chordophone - a stringed instrument of the group including harps, lutes, lyres, and zithers
balalaika - a stringed instrument that has a triangular body and three strings
harp - a chordophone that has a triangular frame consisting of a sounding board and a pillar and a curved neck; the strings stretched between the neck and the soundbox are plucked with the fingers
lute - chordophone consisting of a plucked instrument having a pear-shaped body, a usually bent neck, and a fretted fingerboard
mandolin - a stringed instrument related to the lute, usually played with a plectrum
stringed instrument - a musical instrument in which taut strings provide the source of sound
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
cordofono
References in periodicals archive ?
Oladipo noted that a lot was learnt about acquiring knowledge as regards other people's culture and tradition, while classifying musical instruments in Africa into four typologies: the membranophones which are based on membranes (drums); the chordophones based on strings; the aerophones that are dependent on blowing the air and Idiophone which makes music by striking and shaking nature.
Years in the making, The Banjo is filled with research and anecdotes, moving from the history and distribution of diverse African chordophones through their widespread Caribbean descendants and on to their North American counterparts and performers.
The zoolophone is an idiophone--an instrument that produces sound through its own vibration rather than employing strings (chordophones), columns of air (aerophones), or membranes (membranophones).
To categorize instruments, I employ the modern classification system (Hornbostel and Sachs), which classifies all instruments into four main categories according to the way in which sound is produced: aerophones, idiophones, membranophones and chordophones.
The author chose to organize the organology section by first addressing general, historical, and regional studies of Spanish instruments, followed with the organological divisions of aerophones, chordophones, idiophones, and membranophones.