choregic

choregic

(kəˈriːdʒɪk)
adj
(Theatre) relating to a choregus
References in periodicals archive ?
If their dramatist won, they could then erect a choregic monument in their own honor, such as Lysikrates erected above the Theater of Dionysos.
The adjacent area was embellished with an important public square--an ancient counterpart of the modern Lysikrates Square--which featured prominent buildings, at least one cult center, and many preserved choregic monuments dating from the Classical period onward.
17) He describes the choregic monuments found on the Street of the Tripods and recounts the famous story of one Athenian's obsession over a celebrated satyr statue by Praxiteles that was located there.
In his explanation of the name of the street, with its dense collection of choregic monuments, Pausanias presumably describes the antiquities preserved in and around the modern Lysikrates Square.
Having returned to the eastern city to survey the south slope of the Acropolis, Pausanias would have had to have first walked north, without comment, past the choregic monuments along the Street of the Tripods, only to turn back to them immediately after reaching the Prytaneion for a second time.
In the formulation of one 19th-century antiquarian, the route of Pausanias's return to the Prytaneion went "through the street of the tripods, between the theatre and choregic grotto.
57) After mentioning the "marble throne" of the Monument of Lysikrates, whose dedicatory inscription he transcribed, Cyriacus immediately noted another such choregic seat in the gymnasium.
In antiquity the proposed site of the Prytaneion was across from the Street of the Tripods, sharing a moderately large square with the Monument of Lysikrates and its choregic neighbors (as reconstructed in Fig.
110) The larger choregic monument immediately to the south of the monument was found, meanwhile, to rest on the remains of an earlier monument of the 5th century.
The presence of the 4th-century stoa would help to explain the great height of the contemporary choregic monuments.
His attempt to ethicize the ideology of liturgical donation is significant because Demetrius of Phaleron seems to have abolished the choregic liturgy, and perhaps other liturgies as well; see Wehrli, Frag.
Tripods as agonistic and choregic dedications: Scheibler 1988; Amandry 1976, pp.