chorography

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chorography

a systematic, description and analysis of a region
Not to be confused with:
choreography – the art of arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

cho·rog·ra·phy

 (kə-rŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. The technique of mapping a region or district.
2. A description or map of a region.

[Latin chōrographia, from Greek khōrographiā : khōros, place; see ghē- in Indo-European roots + -graphiā, -graphy.]

cho·rog′ra·pher n.
cho′ro·graph′ic (kôr′ə-grăf′ĭk), cho′ro·graph′i·cal adj.
cho′ro·graph′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chorography

(kɒˈrɒɡrəfɪ)
npl -phies
1. (Physical Geography) the technique of mapping regions
2. (Physical Geography) a description or map of a region, as opposed to a small area
[C16: via Latin from Greek khōrographia, from khōros place, country + -graphy]
choˈrographer n
chorographic, ˌchoroˈgraphical adj
ˌchoroˈgraphically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cho•rog•ra•phy

(kəˈrɒg rə fi, kɔ-, koʊ-)

n., pl. -phies.
a systematic description of regional geography, or the methods used to arrive at this.
[1550–60; < Latin chōrographia < Greek chōrographía=chōro-, comb. form of chṓra region + -graphia -graphy]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chorography

1. a description, map, or chart of a particular region or area.
2. the art of preparing such descriptions or maps. — chorographer, n. — chorographic, adj.
See also: Maps
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

chorography

The art or practice of drawing maps.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the most logically organized of the book's parts, with a chapter on Leland framed by a valuable opening chapter on the motivations behind travel at the outset of the early modern era, and later chapters on "Leland's Scottish counterparts" (14) and the early efforts of chorographers, such as William Harrison, John Stow and William Lambarde, in the reign of Elizabeth.
Since the two chorographers met they have been questioning the limits of classical dance.
"For the wedding I didn't have to move too much, we just hobbled around in a little circle and I'd seen Strictly before and the stuff they do on it and I thought, 'Do they realise I'm an amputee?' "But the chorographers, Paul and Shauna, were fantastic."
The show not only stars young people, but it's also put together by them with 20-year-old producers and chorographers taking the lead and bringing in fresh ideas.
Tremblay met with the Jackson Estate and King, heard all the ideas for the show, saw them take shape, and helped put together a team at Cirque du Soleil's headquaters in Montreal that included international caliber chorographers, musical designers and directors, set and costume designers, an acrobatic performance designer, and many more behind the scenes workers.