chosen people


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chosen people

pl n
any of various peoples believing themselves to be chosen by God, esp the Jews
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cho′sen peo′ple


n.pl.
(often caps.)
the Israelites. Ex. 19.
[1525–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chosen people

The Jews or ancient Hebrews or Israelites believe themselves to be the nation chosen by God. They have made a convenant with God.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chosen people - any people believing themselves to be chosen by God
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
Hebrews, Israelites - the ethnic group claiming descent from Abraham and Isaac (especially from Isaac's son Jacob); the nation whom God chose to receive his revelation and with whom God chose to make a covenant (Exodus 19)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Ye lonesome ones of to-day, ye seceding ones, ye shall one day be a people: out of you who have chosen yourselves, shall a chosen people arise:--and out of it the Superman.
Perhaps the Jews are still the chosen people, but now they bear the message of humanity, while once they bore the message of divinity.
"He who could draw it from the rocks will not now abandon His own chosen people."
They were a pure chosen people, destined to found a new race and a new life, to renew and purify the earth, but no one had seen these men, no one had heard their words and their voices.
For them he borrows from German criticism the name 'Philistines,' enemies of the chosen people, and he finds their prevailing traits to be intellectual and spiritual narrowness and a fatal and superficial satisfaction with mere activity and material prosperity.
Rebecca, however erroneously taught to interpret the promises of Scripture to the chosen people of Heaven, did not err in supposing the present to be their hour of trial, or in trusting that the children of Zion would be one day called in with the fulness of the Gentiles.
To multiply instances where it were impossible to adduce an exception would be to waste your time and abuse your patience; but in the sacred volume, which contains the substances of our firmest faith and of our most precious hopes, these passions not only maintain their highest efficacy, but are sanctioned by the express injunctions of the Divine Legislator to his chosen people.
O'Hare deserves credit for forcing us to recognize the tension that often exists between our desire for some universally valid pattern of belief and Panikkar's conviction that "the whole idea of belonging to a chosen People (in the triumphalist, exclusivist sense), of practicing the true religion, of being a privileged creature, struck me not as a grace but as a disgrace." O'Hare sees clearly that "all seek faithfulness, but paths are particular" (44) and draws on Stendahl to respond to the frequent Christian critique of Jewish "chosenness":
In a time when Jews were accused of circumcising Christians (an unlikely gesture for a chosen people to include their persecutors in Abraham's covenant), Leti's Italian wanted a pound of 'the unmentionable Genitals of the Jew." Much of the story is quite similar to Shakespeare's (e.g., the contract, trial, technicality, and dismissal).
How could a just God give his chosen people hemorrhoids, hernias, and pogroms and deny them the combination of cheese and meat?
Why, the chosen people may be forgiven for asking, were we chosen?
He describes the characteristics of this Christian Americanism--which is composed of a conception of America as a "promised land" occupied by a "chosen people", a conception that was incorporated into the doctrine of Manifest Destiny, and the myth of the frontier hero who operates at the line between the "chosen" and the godless "not-chosen," where there is no neutral meeting ground--and discusses its role in leading to the Iraq war debacle.