chrematistic

chrematistic

(ˌkriːməˈtɪstɪk)
adj
(Economics) of, denoting, or relating to money-making
[C18: from Greek, from khrēmatizein to make money, from khrēma money]
ˌchremaˈtistics n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Kirkpatrick, A., 'Purposeless Technology and Chrematistic Pursuits: The Implicit Subordination of Homo-Economicus', Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy, vol.
In the post-lunch round, unfortunately he stumbled on 'Chrematistic' (meaning of, relating to, or occupied in the gaining of wealth), missing out the 'h' in the second place.
Such "chrematistic" activity is wrong because it permits the individual to live apart from community, whereas only in community can the individual find true fulfillment.
And this was proved by Aristotle's chrematistic's goals.
Karl Marx, in Das Kapital, understood very well this issue and his reflections find its roots in the distinction between economy and chrematistic postulated by Aristotle in his Politics.
Capital is able to engage in its chrematistic operation of producing value and reaping surplus value or profit only if it meets the test of material economic reproducibility of any human society which requires that social demand for basic goods be met in a way that does not chronically misallocate resources and ensures that the direct producers receive, at minimum, the product of their necessary labour.
This is called Chrematistic wealth and since it is without reference to the good of the family household and the state for the sake of the members of these associations or indeed for any other association for the sake of the good life, it seems that it does not have a limit.
Using Marxian terminology, he defines these as "economic" and "chrematistic" (generally corresponding, he points out, to J.
This is the acquisition of goods solely for use; "wealth in the true sense consists of property such as this." According to Aristotle, "the amount of property of this kind which would give self-sufficiency for a good life is not limitless." (23) In contrast to this household or "economic" form is the "chrematistic" form of unnatural acquisition.
But one also needs to recall the first volume of Capital where Marx drew on Aristotle's distinction between oeconomic, as the art of gaining a livelihood, and chrematistic, or the skill of trafficking goods and money.