chrematistics


Also found in: Wikipedia.

chrematistics

1. the study of wealth.
2. any theory of wealth as measured in money. — chrematistic, adj.
See also: Money
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
There he distinguishes between economics proper, oikonomia--household management and the generation of productive wealth--and chrematistics, the science of wealth that is skimmed off the activities of others, often through speculation or usury.
Cendejas, Jose Luis (2017), "Economics, chrematistics, oikos and polis in Aristotle and St.
The Ancient Greeks would not consider the political economy described above as 'economics,' but as chrematistics. The goal of chrematistics is unlimited accumulation through 'the manipulation of property and wealth so as to maximize short-term monetary exchange value.' (102) In contrast to this is Oikonomia, the etymological root for the English word economics.
He thinks that profit is a modern form of Aristotle's concept of unlimited chrematistics and that as such, it is incompatible with the Aristotelian orientation of the economy to the good life of virtues.
Chapter 2 is entitled '"The economic" and chrematistics'--Crespo's rendering of Aristoue's frequent association of the two adjectives oikonomike and chrematistike.
He looks into economics and chrematistics, and gives an ontological analysis of Aristotle's science of economics and of economic and ethics, describes economics and politics to the economics of happiness, and gives Aristotle's take on causation and explanation and compares it to current social and economic science.
The classification of toppling failure is according to the angle of the toppling rock layer and the normal rock layer and the physical chrematistics of the failure surface.
Looking at the results obtained for fruit yield and other plant chrematistics, it can be assumed that different male pollens contain different genetic makeup and can be beneficial or harmful for potential date production.
It is Hawkes's contention, pace Derrida, that the conceptual shift from Aristotelian "economics" defined as "practical management of the household," where money is "limited to its natural function as a medium of exchange," to chrematistics in which "money becomes an end in itself" generates the startling equivalence that "usury is to money what difference is to language" (10-11).