chrestomathy


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chres·tom·a·thy

 (krĕ-stŏm′ə-thē)
n. pl. chres·tom·a·thies
1. A selection of literary passages, usually by one author.
2. An anthology used in studying a language.

[Greek khrēstomatheia : khrēstos, useful (from khrēsthai, to use; see gher- in Indo-European roots) + -matheia, body of learning (from manthanein, math-, to learn; see mendh- in Indo-European roots).]

chres′to·math′ic (krĕs′tə-măth′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chrestomathy

(krɛsˈtɒməθɪ)
n, pl -thies
(Linguistics) rare a collection of literary passages, used in the study of language
[C19: from Greek khrēstomatheia, from khrēstos useful + mathein to learn]
chrestomathic, chrestomathical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chres•tom•a•thy

(krɛsˈtɒm ə θi)

n., pl. -thies.
a collection of selected literary passages, often by one author and esp. from a foreign language.
[1825–35; < New Latin chrestomathia < Greek chrēstomátheia, derivative of chrēstó(s) useful]
chres`to•math′ic (-təˈmæθ ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chrestomathy

1. a collection of literary selections, especially in a foreign language, as an aid to learning.
2. a collection of literary selections from one author. — chrestomathie, adj.
See also: Collections and Collecting
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Chrestomathy

 a selection of choice literary passages from one or more authors, 1832.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chrestomathy - a selection of passages from different authors that is compiled as an aid in learning a language
excerpt, excerption, extract, selection - a passage selected from a larger work; "he presented excerpts from William James' philosophical writings"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Fragment #1 -- Photius, Epitome of the Chrestomathy of Proclus: The Epic Cycle begins with the fabled union of Heaven and Earth, by which they make three hundred-handed sons and three Cyclopes to be born to him.
see Max Leopold Margolis, A Manual of the Aramaic Language of the Babylonian Talmud: Grammar, Chrestomathy, and Glossaries (Heidelberg: C.
He is the author of two textbooks for the students of the Russian-Kazakh schools: "Kirghiz Chrestomathy" and "Initial Guidance on Teaching the Kirghiz to Russian".
The occasion struck me as an appropriate time for a chrestomathy of the presumed best of my work--original puns and other wordplay organized by genre.
Mencken, The Divine Afflatus, in A Mencken Chrestomathy
I suppose back then I'd have called a book like this latest one a chrestomathy, swiping from H.L.
In his chrestomathy, Laszlo Keresztes (1990:67) discusses the suffixes only in an enumerative manner and considers the -ma, -mo/-me elements to be abstract nominal suffixes (valgoma 'perching, slope', eramo 'life') and suffixes referring to instruments and tools (izamo 'harrow', sulgamo 'clasp, fastener, buckle'.
Mencken, "Abraham Lincoln" (1922) and "The Calamity of Appomattox" (September 1930), A Mencken Chrestomathy: His Own Selection of His Choicest Writings (New York: Vintage, 1982), pp.
As some texts were inaccessible in the concordance of medieval texts, some texts relevant to this analysis are occasionally cited according to the chrestomathy of Stefanie et al 1969.