chromatolysis


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chro·ma·tol·y·sis

 (krō′mə-tŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The dissolution or disintegration of chromophil material, such as chromatin, within a cell.

chro·mat′o·lyt′ic (-măt′l-ĭt′ĭk) adj.

chromatolysis

(ˌkrəʊməˈtɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Biology) cytology the dissolution of stained material, such as chromatin in injured cells

chromatolysis

the breakdown of the protoplasm that contains the genes in the cell nucleus.
See also: Cells
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, most neurons in the cortical lesions of the vehicle-treated mice exhibited some or all of the following features: Nissl bodies' reduction, chromatolysis, nuclear pyknosis, eosinophilic cytoplasm, or a lack of cellular structure.
Chromatolysis indicates neurodegeneration due to insufficient amount of protein in the neuron (23).
Neurological deficit, numeric density of neurons in hippocampal CA1 region, and percentage of neurons with focal and total chromatolysis were studied.
Histologic examination of the brain revealed microspongiosis, edema, gliosis, and neuronal chromatolysis of surrounding periventricular tissue.
We also observed dystrophic changes in the neurons, including mainly chromatolysis in medial cortex and pycnotic changes in the upper layers.
This observation may suggest that following chromatolysis and degeneration of the nucleus in both GCs and oocytes, intensive deficiency in proteins and in the metabolism of carbohydrates, as an essential source of energy, will occur.
In a postmortem study of nine patients with RA and myelopathy, Henderson and coworkers (31) noted that the cord pathology occurred mostly in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord and was characterized by axonal degeneration, central chromatolysis, and axonal retraction.
In the central nervous system, the neural cell body undergoes chromatolysis with peripheral shifting of the Nissl bodies (stocked metabolites) and a decrease in their number.
This same drug also produced vestibulocochlear Wallerian-like degeneration and retinal ganglion cell chromatolysis in dogs treated for 14 weeks at 180 mg/kg/day, a dose that resulted in a mean plasma drug level similar to that seen with the 60 mg/kg/day dose.