chromatolysis


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

chro·ma·tol·y·sis

 (krō′mə-tŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The dissolution or disintegration of chromophil material, such as chromatin, within a cell.

chro·mat′o·lyt′ic (-măt′l-ĭt′ĭk) adj.

chromatolysis

(ˌkrəʊməˈtɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Biology) cytology the dissolution of stained material, such as chromatin in injured cells

chromatolysis

the breakdown of the protoplasm that contains the genes in the cell nucleus.
See also: Cells
References in periodicals archive ?
The most consistent and conspicuous observation in cell body following nerve injury is probably chromatolysis, which involves the disintegration of the Nissl substance (large condensation of the endoplasmic reticulum).
Moderate-to-severe disruption in cellular arrangement of organ of corti, hydropic and vacuolar degeneration, loss of inner and outer hair cells, chromatolysis in spiral ganglion cells, cytoplasmic and nuclear condensation, reduction in number of nuclei and neurons, irregular satellite cells, and hydropic and vacuolar degeneration in stria vascularis in groups 2 (Figure 1-2) and 3.
Additionally, the presence of giant hepatocytes without distinct cell borders and morphological changes such as pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and chromatolysis were constant features in the centrilobular area.
[14] After 1month, 0.7 and 0.5 mg/kg ketamine administrations on 16 adult dogs at lumbar and sacral parts gliosis, axonal edema central chromatolysis, lymphocyte infiltration, and fibrosis thickening of dura mater were observed.
The only difference between the groups treated with barley with that of the control group is that there is the presence of chromatolysis in the hippocampus of the previous group.
In contrast, most neurons in the cortical lesions of the vehicle-treated mice exhibited some or all of the following features: Nissl bodies' reduction, chromatolysis, nuclear pyknosis, eosinophilic cytoplasm, or a lack of cellular structure.
Chromatolysis indicates neurodegeneration due to insufficient amount of protein in the neuron (23).
Perinatal nicotine exposure induced pyknosis and chromatolysis of the medullary neurons at D7 (Figure 7(g)), D15 (Figure 7(h)), and D30 (Figure 7(i)).
In comparison, in T group (Figure 4(b)), the organization of the pyramidal layer is lost: chromatolysis, a sign of cellular damage, can be observed, and the cell body is swollen, with a loss of Nissl substance.
Neurological deficit, numeric density of neurons in hippocampal CA1 region, and percentage of neurons with focal and total chromatolysis were studied.
Histologic examination of the brain revealed microspongiosis, edema, gliosis, and neuronal chromatolysis of surrounding periventricular tissue.