chromosphere


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chro·mo·sphere

 (krō′mə-sfîr′)
n.
1. An incandescent, transparent layer of gas, primarily hydrogen, several thousand miles in depth, lying above and surrounding the photosphere of a star, such as the sun, but distinctly separate from the corona.
2. A gaseous layer similar to a chromosphere around a star.

chro′mo·spher′ic (-sfîr′ĭk, -sfĕr′-) adj.

chromosphere

(ˈkrəʊməˌsfɪə)
n
(Astronomy) a gaseous layer of the sun's atmosphere extending from the photosphere to the corona and visible during a total eclipse of the sun
chromospheric adj

chro•mo•sphere

(ˈkroʊ məˌsfɪər)

n.
1. a gaseous envelope surrounding the sun from which hydrogen and other gases erupt.
2. a gaseous envelope surrounding a star.
[1865–70]
chro`mo•spher′ic (-ˈsfɛr ɪk, -ˈsfɪər-) adj.

chro·mo·sphere

(krō′mə-sfîr′)
A glowing, transparent layer of gas surrounding the photosphere of a star, especially the sun. The sun's chromosphere is several thousand miles thick and is composed mainly of hydrogen.

chromosphere

A layer of gas that lies above the photosphere of a star, such as the Sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chromosphere - a gaseous layer of the sun's atmosphere (extending from the photosphere to the corona) that is visible during a total eclipse of the sun
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
Sun - the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system; "the sun contains 99.85% of the mass in the solar system"; "the Earth revolves around the Sun"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Solar Chromosphere (The International Astrophysics Series), Chapman and Hall, London, U.K., 1974.
Even stranger, there is a temperature minimum of about 4000A*C between the two layers, just a few hundred kilometres above the visible surface in the part of Sun's atmosphere called the chromosphere.
The book begins with the composition of our star and an explanation of the various features to be found in the chromosphere and photosphere.
Papers from an October 2006 meeting present recent work on spectroheliograph equipment and observations, the structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere, active regions and sun spots, prominences and filaments, chromospheric flares, long-term solar variations, and solar physics instrumentation.
This ultrasharp image of the sun's chromosphere, a layer sandwiched between the star's visible surface and its outer atmosphere, reveals a surprisingly complex array of filaments of roiling gas, some as small as 70 kilometers across, says Richard Fisher, director of NASA'S heliophysics division in Washington, D.C.
It allows you to directly couple your DSLR with the unit to capture stunning images of the Sun's dynamic chromosphere. Or enjoy the views with the included 1 1/4-inch eyepiece adapter.
In 1913, Charles Maunder made the point even more forcefully, "But under ordinary conditions, we do not see the chromosphere itself, but look down through it on the photosphere, or general radiating surface.
They watched the sun in the microwave wavelengths -- which are used to observe the area of the sun's atmosphere just above the surface, known as the chromosphere. Gopalswamy created precise techniques to use such microwave radiation to measure the intensity of magnetic activity on the sun's surface at the poles.
They watched the sun in the microwave wavelengths - which are used to observe the area of the sun's atmosphere just above the surface, known as the chromosphere.
At the same time, the initially weak magnetic field within the gas cloud is concentrated within the contracting star, which may result in an active chromosphere and material being ejected along the star's magnetic axis (Figure 9).
Papers from a July 2005 meeting in Stein's honor are presented here, in sections on solar surface observations, surface diagnostics, magneto-convection and dynamos, sub-surface solar structures, flux emergence and active regions, sunspots, chromospheric observations and models, and connections between the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona.
To look for evidence of the planet's effect on HD 179949, Shkolnik's team used the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea to record ultraviolet light emitted by calcium ions in the star's chromosphere, a thin layer of gas just above its visible surface.