Chronicles


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chron·i·cle

 (krŏn′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. An extended account in prose or verse of historical events, sometimes including legendary material, presented in chronological order and without authorial interpretation or comment.
2. A detailed narrative record or report.
3. Chronicles(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.
tr.v. chron·i·cled, chron·i·cling, chron·i·cles
To record in or in the form of a historical record.

[Middle English cronicle, from Anglo-Norman, alteration of Old French cronique, from Latin chronica, from Greek khronika (biblia), chronological (books), annals, neuter pl. of khronikos, of time; see chronic.]

chron′i·cler (-klər) n.

Chronicles

(ˈkrɒnɪkəlz)
n
(Bible) (functioning as singular) either of two historical books (I and II Chronicles) of the Old Testament

Chron•i•cles

(ˈkrɒn ɪ kəlz)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
either of two books of the Old Testament, I Chronicles or II Chronicles.
References in classic literature ?
The old chronicles did not weave their history into stories, they simply put down a date and something that happened on that date.
Alfred caused the Chronicle to be written up from such books and records as he had from the coming of the Romans until the time in which he himself reigned.
From the Chronicle we learn a great deal about his wars with the Danes, and of how he fought them both by land and by sea.
Most numerous of all the prose works, perhaps, were the Chronicles, which were produced generally in the monasteries and chiefly in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the greater part in Latin, some in French, and a few in rude English verse.
Geoffrey, a literary and ecclesiastical adventurer looking about for a means of making himself famous, put forth about the year 1136, in Latin, a 'History of the Britons' from the earliest times to the seventh century, in which, imitating the form of the serious chronicles, he combined in cleverly impudent fashion all the adaptable miscellaneous material, fictitious, legendary, or traditional, which he found at hand.
George and the Dragon; which dragon I maintain to have been a whale; for in many old chronicles whales and dragons are strangely jumbled together, and often stand for each other.
While there she incidentally contrived to hurry Ludovic Speed in his leisurely courting of Theodora Dix, as related duly in another chronicle of her history.
Through the kindness of Dorothy Gale of Kansas, afterward Princess Dorothy of Oz, an humble writer in the United States of America was once appointed Royal Historian of Oz, with the privilege of writing the chronicle of that wonderful fairyland.
The reader will be pleased to remember, that, at the beginning of the second book of this history, we gave him a hint of our intention to pass over several large periods of time, in which nothing happened worthy of being recorded in a chronicle of this kind.
I cannot explain the phenomena;I can only set down here in the words of an ordinary soldier of fortune a chronicle of the strange events that befell me during the ten years that my dead body lay undiscovered in an Arizona cave.
Possibly the suggestions which I gained upon Mars, and the knowledge which I can set down in this chronicle, will aid in an earlier understanding of the mysteries of our sister planet; mysteries to you, but no longer mysteries to me.
Thus did the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five conduct their Greatnesses, and myriads of small creatures--the creatures of this chronicle among the rest--along the roads that lay before them.