chryselephantine


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chrys·el·e·phan·tine

 (krĭ-sĕl′ə-făn′tēn′, -tīn′)
adj.
Made of gold and ivory, as certain pieces of sculpture or artwork in ancient Greece.

[Greek khrūselephantinos : khrūs-, khrūso-, chryso- + elephās, elephant-, ivory; see elephant.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chryselephantine

(ˌkrɪsɛlɪˈfæntɪn)
adj
(Art Terms) (of ancient Greek statues) made of or overlaid with gold and ivory
[C19: from Greek khruselephantinos, from khrusos gold + elephas ivory; see elephant]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chryselephantine

Made or decorated with gold and ivory, in the manner of ancient Greek statues.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chiparus subsequently went on to experiment with combining painted bronze with ivory, a technique known as chryselephantine.
Chiparus subsequently went on to experiment with the process of combining painted bronze with ivory, a technique known as chryselephantine.
Nixon, "Hopkins on Tennyson: Atomism, Parnassian, Chryselephantine," in Saving Beauty: Further Studies in Hopkins, ed.
He devotes only this sentence to the entire Parthenon and seems to be more interested in the colossal chryselephantine cult statue of Athena which he describes in more detail.
Fair enough, but entering the lists, he is surely obligated to take also into consideration Mulligan's chryselephantine brush, which by virtue of Stephen's first mental epithet for his rival ("Chrysostomos") must be moved to the "object" column.
These include 'chryselephantine' sculptures--a style of sculpture that combined ivory with gold, used in Greece during the archaic and classical periods.
For example, the famous chryselephantine statue of the god in his principal shrine at Epidaurus is described by Pausanias as "sitting on a seat, grasping a staff; the other hand he is holding above the head of the serpent; there is also a figure of a dog lying by his side." (16) It is in this aspect that he appears in Cartari's Images of the Antique Gods (Le Imagini de gli dei de li antichi) (fig.
Ivory was the centre of much attention as this material had enabled artists to revisit chryselephantine sculpture, a genre that had been first developed in Ancient Greece.
The death of Ferdinand Preiss in 1943 from a brain tumour was marked when his prediction that his beautiful Art Deco figures in chryselephantine would rise dramatically in value was proved right.
chryselephantine cult statue in his temple represented him sitting on a throne, holding a staff in one hand and placing the other above the head of a snake.