churchism

churchism

(ˈtʃɜːtʃɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) adherence to the principles of an established church

churchism

belief in a church or religious system.
See also: Religion
References in periodicals archive ?
Sanders' description of Investigative Poetics--his hybrid of the historical and documentary poem--characterizes this mode of writing as a critical form of oppositional poetics: "Investigative poesy is freed from capitalism, churchism, and other totalitarianisms [.
While living in Brussels, probably in July 1842, Bronte wrote to her friend Ellen Nussey, "I consider Methodism, Quakerism & the extremes of high & low Churchism foolish but Roman Catholicism beats them all" (Smith 1: 289-90).
The field here is ripe for the harvest; this is the very hotbed of presbyterianism and free churchism, a blow can be struck here more effectually than in any other part of Ireland.
the very hotbed of presbyterianism and free churchism," concluding that "a blow can be struck here more effectively than in any other part of Ireland.
I worry that many of them will buy its distorted views of history because advocates like Wiley get these distortions into print, If Bush is elected, his supporters will view the victory as their mandate to bring back legislated churchism.
Even in the prime of Eliot's influence, many readers needed to overlook his Christianity: most who admired his aesthetic achievements and theories had no desire to indulge his monarchical politics and his hyper-old-fashioned High Churchism.
One might as well object to the neo-high churchism that pervaded the New Criticism in its heyday.
Horsley's High Churchism led him to hold the Roman Church a true branch of the Catholic Church and he attempted to understand its |corruptions' with sympathy.
Hoekendijk's suspicion of churchism can also be understood in this connection.