churchwoman


Also found in: Thesaurus.

church·wom·an

 (chûrch′wo͝om′ən)
n.
1. A woman who is a cleric.
2. A woman who is a member of a church.

churchwoman

(ˈtʃɜːtʃˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a female practising member of a church

church•wom•an

(ˈtʃɜrtʃˌwʊm ən)

n., pl. -wom•en.
a woman who is a member of a church.
[1715–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

churchwoman

noun
A person ordained for service in a Christian church:
Informal: reverend.
Translations

churchwoman

[ˈtʃɜːtʃˌwʊmən] N (churchwomen (pl)) → fiel f practicante
References in classic literature ?
A strange conclusion for a staid churchwoman like Mrs.
A senior churchwoman spoke at the Scottish Parliament yesterday about the tragedy of genocide.
As the abbess of a prominent monastery, she was the most influential churchwoman of the age.
Inside, stories skewed toward warning good Anglicans against the nefarious papist presence in Canada, or detailing the duties and role of the good and proper churchwoman.
CHURCHWOMAN Sheila Bamber is swapping the Tyne for the Wear.
It's for the churchwoman. It's for everyday women of various builds who want to look good going from a boardroom to a brunch.
The disgraced churchwoman, who was known as the Rev Helen Percy when she admitted an affair with a church elder in Kilry, Perthshire, admitted obtaining pounds 3428 by fraud.
The contribution which she made to Central Africa in her medical missionary work was outstanding, and in recent years she made increasingly important contributions to the work of the Church of England on the Wirral." The Rev Dr Pat Nickson, OBE, medical missionary and churchwoman; born, July 7, 1944, died, April 26, 2009
Pauline was precocious and outspoken, interested and knowledgeable about geology, a High Churchwoman strong enough to stand up to her husband's radical views (anti-war, anti-drink, vegetarian).
From the famous painting of Salem - showing a traditionally garbed churchwoman concealing the devil in her shawl - to today's school eisteddfodau every March 1, the dress has long acted as an iconic element of our nationhood.
The sixth and final section includes responses from a white North American feminist biblical scholar (Phyllis Bird), an East African theologian and churchwoman (Nyambura J.