churchyard


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church·yard

 (chûrch′yärd′)
n.
1. A yard adjacent to a church, especially a cemetery.
2. The ground on which a church stands.

churchyard

(ˈtʃɜːtʃˌjɑːd)
n
the grounds surrounding a church, usually used as a graveyard

church•yard

(ˈtʃɜrtʃˌyɑrd)

n.
the yard or ground adjoining a church, often used as a graveyard.
[1125–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.churchyard - the yard associated with a churchchurchyard - the yard associated with a church  
yard - a tract of land enclosed for particular activities (sometimes paved and usually associated with buildings); "they opened a repair yard on the edge of town"
Translations
فِناء الكَنيسَه
hřbitov
kirkegård
sírkert
kirkjugarîur
kilise mezarlık avlusu

churchyard

[ˈtʃɜːtʃjɑːd] Ncementerio m, campo m santo

churchyard

[ˈtʃɜːrtʃjɑːrd] ncimetière m

churchyard

nFriedhof m, → Kirchhof m (old, dial)

churchyard

[ˈtʃɜːtʃˌjɑːd] ncimitero (annesso a una chiesa)

church

(tʃəːtʃ) noun
1. a building for public Christian worship.
2. a group of Christians considered as a whole. the Catholic Church.
ˈchurchyard noun
the burial ground round a church.
References in classic literature ?
Irwine and her daughters were waiting at the churchyard gates in their carriage (for they had a carriage now) to shake hands with the bride and bridegroom and wish them well; and in the absence of Miss Lydia Donnithorne at Bath, Mrs.
Events may yet prove that idea to be a delusion, Miss Halcombe; but the belief is strong in me, at this moment, that the fancied ghost in the churchyard, and the writer of the anonymous letter, are one and the same person.
On the top of the churchyard wall is a tombstone, on which are cut in high relief, two ravens, or such-like birds.
And when matins and the first mass were done, there was seen in the churchyard, against the high altar, a great stone foursquare, like unto a marble stone, and in the midst thereof was like an anvil of steel a foot on high, and therein stuck a fair sword naked by the point, and letters there were written in gold about the sword that said thus:-- 'Whoso pulleth out this sword of the stone and anvil is rightwise king born of all England.
In the churchyard the objects were remarkably various, for there was a little country crowd waiting to see the funeral.
Edmunds started back, for he knew him well; many a time he had watched him digging graves in the churchyard.
The day was unusually fine till the afternoon, when some of the gossips who frequent the East Cliff churchyard, and from the commanding eminence watch the wide sweep of sea visible to the north and east, called attention to a sudden show of `mares tails' high in the sky to the northwest.
In accordance with this rule it may safely be assumed that the forefathers of Boston had built the first prison-house somewhere in the Vicinity of Cornhill, almost as seasonably as they marked out the first burial-ground, on Isaac Johnson's lot, and round about his grave, which subsequently became the nucleus of all the congregated sepulchres in the old churchyard of King's Chapel.
These noble qualities flourish as notably in a country church and churchyard as in the drawing-room, or in the closet.
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias, and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip.
He passed on through the churchyard, where, amongst the new headstones, he saw one of a somewhat superior design to the rest.
They are literally, so far as one can ascertain, feasts of the dedication - that is, they were first established in the churchyard on the day on which the village church was opened for public worship, which was on the wake or festival of the patron saint, and have been held on the same day in every year since that time.