churnalism


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churnalism

(ˈtʃɜːnəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) derogatory a type of journalism that relies on reusing existing material such as press releases and wire service reports instead of original research, esp as a result of an increased demand for news content
[C21: a blend of churn (out) and (journ)alism]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ill-informed churnalism, designed to engage readers with facile headlines designed to shock and guilt-trip, has imported a lie about red meat - one based on crudely constructed global statistics cherry-picked from epidemiology, the weakest scientic evidence.
These are is not the kind of mistakes that can be explained away as an example of what one journalist has (https://www.dumptheguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/feb/04/comment.pressandpublishing) termedthe problem of "churnalism": the fact that journalists, chasing breaking news in offices depleted of staff by budget cuts, are too overworked to cover stories properly.
Today, many journalists are reluctant to leave an office, instead doing research from a laptop -- "churnalism" as I like to describe it.
Hernandez Olvera, 2016), iniciativas para detectar el plagio en paginas web (como churnalism.com, aunque actualmente se encuentra inactiva por falta de financiamiento) o capitulos sobre esta praxis en libros de etica periodistica (p.
Take the problem of "churnalism"--press releases that masquerade as journalism.
Also, the distinction between press releases and journalism is quickly becoming fuzzy because many "news sites" now publish press releases with no additional reporting, a process dubbed "churnalism" (Moore, 2011).
"In the 70s and early 80s people were much more serious about journalism; now I think 'churnalism' has undermined people's belief in what they are reading, with exceptions, of course.
Tony Hirst, The Open University, introduced the concept of "churnalism," created by robot writers using Automated Insights' Wordsmith natural language generation platform (automatedinsights.com) or Narrative Science (narrative science.com).
Why is the genre being excluded (as a separate, independent page) and resisted by Wikipedia, although its "Journalism Genres" (9) highlights such derivatives and sub-categories as Ambush journalism, Celebrity or people journalism, Churnalism, Convergence journalism, Investigative journalism, New journalism, Science journalism, and Sports journalism?
The growing number of news outlets, and their varying motivations and funding sources, increases the need for self-policing, as independent news outlets learn to better identify, label and publicly rebuke "churnalism." (As David Weinberger has noted, transparency is the new objectivity.)
But fewer journalists with more space to fill means doing more work in less time often leading to a greater use of unattributed rewrites of press agency or public relations material and the cut and paste practice now known as churnalism (Davies 2008; Lee-Wright, Phillips and Witschge 2011).
Until he took the reins at Campaign some six years ago, much of the stuff you found in industry publications was little more than churnalism: rehashed stories, often dictated by agency PR personnel, with hardly any editorial