entropion

(redirected from cicatricial ectropion)
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entropion

(ɛnˈtrəʊpɪən; ɛnˈtrəʊpɪˌɒn)
n
(Pathology) the turning inwards of the edge of the eyelid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

en·tro·pi·on

, entropium
n. entropión, inversión del párpado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

entropion

n entropión m, inversión f hacia dentro del párpado inferior
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
All four upper and lower eyelids exhibited cicatricial ectropion and lid retraction with significant lagophthalmos and corneal epitheliopathy.
Cicatricial ectropion occurs when relative shortening of the anterior lamellar leads to eversion of the eyelid away from the globe.
Various techniques have been described for correcting cicatricial ectropion by lengthening the anterior lamella with transposition flaps or with full-thickness free skin grafts [3-11].
A retrospective medical record review was performed for all patients who underwent V-to-H rotational myocutaneous flap surgery for mild to moderate lower lid cicatricial ectropion with inferior sclera show (the distance of white sclera below the lower border of the corneal limbus) less than 8 mm at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital Eye Clinic from 2008 to 2016.
The lower lid vectors resulting in lower lid retraction included paralytic ectropion, cicatricial ectropion, involutional ectropion, and congenital ectropion.
Ocular involvement, including chemosis, blepharoconjunctivitis, keratitis, symblepharon, ankyloblepharon, cicatricial ectropion, and mydriasis, was reported in 89% of the affected birds.
Findings on physical examination included left lower eyelid vertical shortening, chemosis, keratitis, dacryocystitis, and cicatricial ectropion secondary to atrophy of the rectus abdominis flap with skin tethering (figure 1, A).
This is called cicatricial ectropion and can happen after wounds or burns.
The wound will usually heal within a few weeks with minimal sequelae but, used injudiciously, it may result in cicatricial ectropion (scar-induced everted eyelid) resulting in a watering eye, lagophthalmos, corneal exposure or medial canthal 'webbing.' Formal surgical reconstruction is, therefore, frequently required, utilising flaps of mobilised healthy tissue adjacent to the area of excision to repair the defect.