cimbalom


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cimbalom

(ˈtsɪmbələm) or

cymbalom

n
(Instruments) a type of dulcimer, esp of Hungary. See dulcimer1
[C19: Hungarian, from Italian cembalo; see cembalo]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Well, the cimbalom was already onstage so it would have been a shame to miss the chance.
Multiple arrangements of Farewell to Stromness exist and are published by Boosey & Hawkes, including those for four bassoons (Fraser Jackson), solo guitar (Timothy Walker), two guitars (Gerald Garcia), and cimbalom (Gregory Knowles).
We love experimenting with new instruments and have been working with neolins and a cimbalom player, which was a very rare find and I think that helps us to keep our sound fresh.
At the time, my colleague, the music aesthetician Roman Dykast, otherwise also first violin of a cimbalom band, recommended to me the folklore of the Kopan ice region in Moravia.
Statman began seeking out a number of masters of maqam-based music for lessons, including Armenian kemenche/tar player Andrinik Aroustamian, Mountain Jewish kemenche player Zevulon Avshalomov, Greek cimbalom player Paul Lemberis, a Romanian-Jewish mandolinist named Martin Kalinsky who also played balalaika and domra and later, Epiorti Greek clarinetist (and NEA National Heritage Fellow) Periklis Halkias.
To give the score a contemporary and fresh feel he included original bespoke electronic sounds and electronically treated dulcimer and cimbalom.
Defamiliarizing noncomic material was another specialty, as when a guest cimbalom player abruptly turned glow-in-the-dark.
The performers, mainly the gypsy, or the Roma, play traditional gypsy tunes and Hungarian folk songs on the violin, contra-bass and cimbalom.
It also includes Richard Grimes, one of a handful of musicians who teach cimbalom - a dulcimer-like stringed instrument.
This production enjoys a larger orchestra than usual, including a few notes here and there from a cimbalom, a peculiar looking thing from Eastern Europe.