cinchona


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cin·cho·na

 (sĭng-kō′nə, sĭn-chō′-)
n.
1. Any of various evergreen trees and shrubs of the genus Cinchona, native chiefly to the Andes, some species of which are cultivated for their bark, which contains quinine and other alkaloids used chiefly to treat malaria.
2. The dried bark of any of these plants. Also called Jesuit's bark, Peruvian bark.

[New Latin Cinchona, genus name, reputedly after Francisca Henríquez de Ribera (1576-1639), Countess of Chinchón.]

cin·chon′ic (sĭng-kŏn′ĭk, sĭn-chŏn′-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cinchona

(sɪŋˈkəʊnə)
n
1. (Plants) any tree or shrub of the South American rubiaceous genus Cinchona, esp C. calisaya, having medicinal bark. Also called: quina or quinaquina
2. (Pharmacology) Also called: cinchona bark, Peruvian bark, calisaya, china bark, quina or quinaquina the dried bark of any of these trees, which yields quinine and other medicinal alkaloids
3. (Pharmacology) any of the drugs derived from cinchona bark
[C18: New Latin, named after the Countess of Chinchón (1576–1639), vicereine of Peru]
cinchonic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cin•cho•na

(sɪŋˈkoʊ nə, sɪn-)

n., pl. -nas.
1. any of several trees or shrubs of the genus Cinchona, of the madder family, native to the Andes, esp. C. calisaya, whose bark yields quinine.
2. the medicinal bark of such trees or shrubs.
[1740–50; < New Latin, after Francisca Enriques de Ribera, Countess of Chinchón (d. 1641), who was associated in several accounts (now considered spurious) with the introduction of quinine into Europe]
cin•chon′ic (-ˈkɒn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cin·cho·na

(sĭng-kō′nə, sĭn-chō′nə)
Any of several evergreen trees and shrubs of South America whose bark is the source of quinine and certain other drugs used to treat malaria.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cinchona - medicinal bark of cinchona treescinchona - medicinal bark of cinchona trees; source of quinine and quinidine
chinchona, cinchona - any of several trees of the genus Cinchona
bark - tough protective covering of the woody stems and roots of trees and other woody plants
2.cinchona - any of several trees of the genus Cinchonacinchona - any of several trees of the genus Cinchona
genus Chinchona, genus Cinchona - large genus of trees of Andean region of South America having medicinal bark
Cartagena bark, Cinchona cordifolia, Cinchona lancifolia - Colombian tree; source of Cartagena bark (a cinchona bark)
calisaya, Cinchona calisaya, Cinchona ledgeriana, Cinchona officinalis - Peruvian shrub or small tree having large glossy leaves and cymes of fragrant yellow to green or red flowers; cultivated for its medicinal bark
Cinchona pubescens, cinchona tree - small tree of Ecuador and Peru having very large glossy leaves and large panicles of fragrant pink flowers; cultivated for its medicinal bark
cinchona, cinchona bark, Jesuit's bark, Peruvian bark - medicinal bark of cinchona trees; source of quinine and quinidine
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cinchona

[sɪŋˈkəʊnə]
A. Nquino m
B. CPD cinchona bark Nquina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of natural ingredients, such as rosemary, cinchona and walnut husk, over chemicals means the product is less likely to cause irritation or allergic reactions.
The active component of this tree (later named Cinchona) is quinine, first extracted from the bark in 1820, and still used in many parts of the world.
Based on the list submitted by the city treasurer to the national treasury, the unutilized PDAF came from the Office of the Vice President, former and current legislators, namely, Senator Edgardo Angara, former Senator Teresa Aquino-Oreta, former Senator Aquilino Pimentel, Senator Antonio Trillanes IV, Emeline Aglipay, Agapito Aquino, Arlene Bag-ao, Mar-Len Abigail Binay, Laarni Cayetano, Neri Javier Colmenares, Zenaida de Castro, Emerenciana de Jesus, Cinchona Gonzales, Monique Yazmin Lagdameo, Teodoro Locsin, Jr., Loreta Ann Rosales, Mark Aeron Sambar, Patricia Serenas, Mariano Michael Velarde, Renee Velarde, and Joel Villanueva.
Cinchona Cruz-Gonzales (Party-List, CIBAC), vice president for Party List; Rep.
Both wines now supplement the original Rainforest range, comprising Una de Gato, Cinchona, Catharantheus Roseus and Dioscorea, and all are recommended.
The cure was quinine, an alkaloid made of the bitter red bark of the cinchona tree found in the Andes.
of Makati (P139 million); and independents Eduardo Nonato Joson of Nueva Ecija ( P158.05 million) and Marcelino Teodoro of Marikina (P153.234 million); Emmanuel Joel Villanueva (P154.25 million) and Cinchona Cruz-Gonzales (P61.9 million) of Citizen's Battle Against Corruption's, Mujiv Hataman (P114 million) of Anak Mindanao and Florencio Noel of An-Waray (P115.4 million).
Butil Partylist Representative Agapito Guanlao; Cibac Partylist Representatives Sherwin Tugna and Cinchona Cruz-Gonzales; Coop-Natco Partylist Representatives Cresente Paez and Anthony Bravo;
The Comelec list also showed the following CIBAC nominees: Luis Lokin Jr., Antonio Manahan and Bibiano Rivera, as well as Sherwin Tugna, Cinchona Cruz-Gonzales and Armi Jane Borje.
The statement was also signed by Representatives Edcel Lagman, Walden Bello, Cinchona Cruz-Gonzales, Emmeline Aglipay, Sherwin Tugna, and Baguilat.