cinder block

(redirected from cinderblock)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cinder block

or cin·der·block (sĭn′dər-blŏk′)
n.
A usually hollow building block made with concrete and coal cinders.

cinder block

n
(Building) the usual US name for breeze block

cin′der block`


n.
a concrete building block made with a cinder aggregate.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cinder block - a light concrete building block made with cinder aggregatecinder block - a light concrete building block made with cinder aggregate; "cinder blocks are called breeze blocks in Britain"
building block - a block of material used in construction work
Translations
betonbloksnelbouwsteen
References in periodicals archive ?
The first Cub covered just 27,000 square feet, a barebones operation built on concrete floors, cinderblock walls and wooden shelves.
Small demolition, construction of 2 full cinderblock walls (16 m2).
We constructed a small cinderblock room with two open-air windows and many, many shelves.
In a downtown whose architectural patrimony has been thinned by periodic bouts of demolition, any building that stands apart from the cinderblock crowd should not be discarded too readily.
Blood stained the concrete floor of what had been a cinderblock building largely used to house chickens.
The school's 40-year-old cinderblock gym will continue to be used for practice.
EF6 Inconceivable 319-379 Brick, stone and cinderblock buildings
The so-called Great Wall of Studio City was unveiled on a 60-foot stretch of cinderblock between the Studio City Hand Wash and an auto shop on Ventura Boulevard.
The early Palestinian camps in Damascus are now neighborhoods of fourand five-story cinderblock apartments.
In Haiti a storm surge of up to 6ft sent waves crashing into cinderblock homes on the shoreline of Les Cayes, 95 miles west of the capital Port-au-Prince.
Just twenty-six inches past the pavilion's main entrance, he built a rough cinderblock wall spanning the width of the building, so that visitors were completely barred from passing farther than this messy liminal zone, strewn with the detritus of the wall's construction and a now unenclosed toilet.
How in the world can anyone justify rounding up Palestinian citizens in 1948, putting them on trucks, moving them to internment camps to live in tents for the next 30 years (until cinderblock shelters were built), and taking their homes, land, and lives from them?