cinders


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cin·der

 (sĭn′dər)
n.
1.
a. A small piece of burned or partly burned substance, such as coal, that is not reduced to ashes but is incapable of further combustion.
b. A piece of charred substance that can burn further but without flame.
2. cinders Ashes.
3. cinders Geology See scoria.
4. Metallurgy See scoria.
5. Slag from a metal furnace.
tr.v. cin·dered, cin·der·ing, cin·ders
To burn or reduce to cinders.

[Alteration (influenced by Old French cendre, ashes) of Middle English sinder, from Old English, slag, dross.]

cin′der·y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cinders

(ˈsɪndəz)
pl n
(Geological Science) geology fragments of volcanic lava; scoriae
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

cinders

[ˈsɪndərz] nplcendres fplcine-camera [ˈsɪnɪkæmrə] n (British)caméra fcine-film [ˈsɪnɪfɪlm] n (British)film m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
My sole recollection, from the time I fell under the trees until I awoke the following evening, is of my head out of the window, facing the wind caused by the train, cinders striking and burning and blinding me, while I breathed with will.
The blows of the basement hammer every day grew more and more between; and each blow every day grew fainter than the last; the wife sat frozen at the window, with tearless eyes, glitteringly gazing into the weeping faces of her children; the bellows fell; the forge choked up with cinders; the house was sold; the mother dived down into the long church-yard grass; her children twice followed her thither; and the houseless, familyless old man staggered off a vagabond in crape; his every woe unreverenced; his grey head a scorn to flaxen curls!
Their march this day lay among singular hills and knolls of an indurated red earth, resembling brick, about the bases of which were scattered pumice stones and cinders, the whole bearing traces of the action of fire.
'Couldn't see 'em fer cinders,' he described it, and the MONICA stuck by me....
When the cook had recovered from her fright she lifted up the fish which had fallen into the ashes, but she found them as black as cinders, and not fit to serve up to the Sultan.
'They don't keep this room so tidy as the other,' Alice thought to herself, as she noticed several of the chessmen down in the hearth among the cinders: but in another moment, with a little
Some of the deep gorges and defiles sent up sheets of flame, and clouds of lurid smoke, and sparks and cinders that in the night made them resemble the craters of volcanoes.
I used to imagine them falling to the ground in showers of microscopic cinders as fast as they entered his whiskey-sodden aura.
I was tired of school, tired of winter clothes, of the rutted streets, of the dirty drifts and the piles of cinders that had lain in the yards so long.
Had we burned to cinders aside and apart from the regular track of ships?
The litter was swept up from the carpet, and the cinders and ashes were taken out of the grate, and the whole of it was in the bucket, when her attention was recalled to the children by hearing one of them cry.
While hovering near an altar, on which some villagers were sacrificing a goat, she suddenly seized a piece of the flesh, and carried it, along with a burning cinder, to her nest.