sulcus

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Related to circular sulcus: fornix, circular sulcus of insula

sul·cus

 (sŭl′kəs)
n. pl. sul·ci (-kī, -sī)
1. A deep, narrow furrow or groove, as in an organ or tissue.
2. Any of the narrow fissures separating adjacent convolutions of the brain.

[Latin.]

sul′cal adj.

sulcus

(ˈsʌlkəs)
n, pl -ci (-saɪ)
1. a linear groove, furrow, or slight depression
2. (Anatomy) any of the narrow grooves on the surface of the brain that mark the cerebral convolutions. Compare fissure
[C17: from Latin]

sul•cus

(ˈsʌl kəs)

n., pl. -ci (-sī).
Anat. a groove or fissure, esp. a fissure between two convolutions of the brain.
[1655–65; Latin: furrow]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sulcus - (anatomy) any of the narrow grooves in an organ or tissue especially those that mark the convolutions on the surface of the brain
fissure - (anatomy) a long narrow slit or groove that divides an organ into lobes
central sulcus, fissure of Rolando, Rolando's fissure, sulcus centralis - a brain fissure extending upward on the lateral surface of both hemispheres; separates the frontal and parietal lobes
fissure of Sylvius, lateral cerebral sulcus, sulcus lateralis cerebri, Sylvian fissure - the deepest and most prominent of the cortical fissures; separates the frontal lobes and temporal lobes in both hemispheres
parieto-occipital fissure, parieto-occipital sulcus - a sulcus near the posterior end of each hemisphere that separates the parietal lobes and the occipital lobes in both hemispheres
calcarine fissure, calcarine sulcus - a sulcus in the mesial surface of the occipital lobe of the cerebrum
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
So that, the anterior cerebral artery, the superior circular sulcus and the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery are the borders for the transsection of the corona radiata.
The inferior part should be just above the middle fossa, and ideally should go high enough, to the mid-convexity, to provide access to the suprasylvian circular sulcus.
The Sylvian fissure is widely opened to expose the circular sulcus and insula, as well as all branches of the middle cerabral artery are identified and pro-perly exposed and skeletonized (6).