circumspect

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cir·cum·spect

 (sûr′kəm-spĕkt′)
adj.
Heedful of circumstances and potential consequences; prudent.

[Middle English, from Latin circumspectus, past participle of circumspicere, to take heed : circum-, circum- + specere, to look; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

cir′cum·spec′tion (-spĕk′shən) n.
cir′cum·spect′ly adv.

circumspect

(ˈsɜːkəmˌspɛkt)
adj
cautious, prudent, or discreet
[C15: from Latin circumspectus, from circum- + specere to look]
ˌcircumˈspection n
ˌcircumˈspective adj
ˈcircumˌspectly adv

cir•cum•spect

(ˈsɜr kəmˌspɛkt)

adj.
watchful and discreet; cautious; prudent: circumspect behavior.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin circumspectus, past participle of circumspicere to look around =circum- circum- + -spicere, comb. form of specere to observe]
cir′cum•spect`ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.circumspect - heedful of potential consequences; "circumspect actions"; "physicians are now more circumspect about recommending its use"; "a discreet investor"
prudent - careful and sensible; marked by sound judgment; "a prudent manager"; "prudent rulers"; "prudent hesitation"; "more prudent to hide than to fight"

circumspect

circumspect

adjective
Trying attentively to avoid danger, risk, or error:
Translations

circumspect

[ˈsɜːkəmspekt] ADJcircunspecto, prudente

circumspect

[ˈsɜːrkəm!spɛkt] adj (= cautious) → circonspect(e)

circumspect

adjumsichtig

circumspect

[ˈsɜːkəmˌspɛkt] adjcircospetto/a
References in classic literature ?
Upon the whole, I commend my own conduct in this affair extremely, and regard it as a very happy instance of circumspection and tenderness.
Prudence and circumspection are necessary even to the best of men.
The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.
When with due circumspection Napoleon was informed that Moscow was empty, he looked angrily at his informant, turned away, and silently continued to walk to and fro.
I had to act with the utmost circumspection to save myself from the suspicion of insanity.