circumventive


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cir·cum·vent

 (sûr′kəm-vĕnt′)
tr.v. cir·cum·vent·ed, cir·cum·vent·ing, cir·cum·vents
1. To surround (an enemy, for example); enclose or entrap.
2. To go around; bypass: circumvented the city.
3. To avoid or get around by artful maneuvering: circumvented the bureaucratic red tape.

[Middle English circumventen, from Latin circumvenīre, circumvent- : circum-, circum- + venīre, to go, come; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

cir′cum·vent′er, cir′cum·ven′tor n.
cir′cum·ven′tion n.
cir′cum·ven′tive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
veiled manner, their inherent circumventive nature has made them a
From a game-theory perspective, how particular policy strategies work in practice is codetermined by the rales officials promulgate and by regulatees' ability to find and exploit circumventive loopholes in the enforcement of these rales.
See also Sven Bergmann, "Fertility Tourism: Circumventive Routes That Enable Access to Reproductive Technologies and Substances" (2011) 36:2 Signs 280 at 284.
Market competition has prompted the banks to find loopholes to make loans and attract deposits via unconventional channels, such as shadow banking or circumventive financing activities, including wealth management products, trust loans, entrusted loans, bank acceptance bills, and micro (or private) loans.
63) Absent the threat of penalty, landlords and tenants will engage in these circumventive transactions and the "black market" level (64) of exchange will approach the free-market equilibrium despite the price ceiling.
How particular policy strategies actually work in practice is co-determined by the rules officials adopt, and by regulatees' ability to find and exploit circumventive loopholes in the enforcement of these rules.
While he sometimes takes a circumventive route to reach his conclusions, his methodology is sound and his deductions convincing.