circumvolve

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cir·cum·volve

 (sûr′kəm-vŏlv′)
intr. & tr.v. cir·cum·volved, cir·cum·volv·ing, cir·cum·volves
To revolve or cause to revolve.

[Latin circumvolvere : circum-, circum- + volvere, to roll; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

circumvolve

(ˌsɜːkəmˈvɒlv)
vb
to (cause to) turn around
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cir•cum•volve

(ˌsɜr kəmˈvɒlv)

v.t., v.i. -volved, -volv•ing.
to revolve or wind about.
[1590–1600; < Latin circumvolvere=circum- circum- + volvere to roll (see evolve)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.circumvolve - cause to turn on an axis or center; "Rotate the handle"
crank up, crank - rotate with a crank
turn - change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense; "Turn towards me"; "The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face"; "She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs"
revolve, rotate, go around - turn on or around an axis or a center; "The Earth revolves around the Sun"; "The lamb roast rotates on a spit over the fire"
birl, twirl, whirl, spin - cause to spin; "spin a coin"
birl, birle - cause a floating log to rotate by treading
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

circumvolve

verb
To move or cause to move in circles or around an axis:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(As an ethical theory it has many thorny problems that I have discussed elsewhere.) (12) Coleridge fretted much about his son Hartley, who displayed "the absence of a Self, it is the want or torpor of Will, that is the mortal sickness of Hartley's Being, and has been, for good & evil, his character--his moral Idiocy--from his earliest Childhood." Hartley has become the "relationless, unconjugated, and intransitive Verb Impersonal with neither Subject nor Object, neither governed [n]or governing." Coleridge wishes Hartley "could but promise himself to be a Self and to construct a circle by the circumvolving line--" (CL, V, 228; CL, VI, 551), a metaphor that simultaneously suggests centering and a ranging outward.
simulated the propagation of QPSK signals though time-varying plasma and constellation circumvolving of the receiving signals was reported in their work [13].
The icon of the Communist revolution, the starfish registers as the circumvolving principle behind the entire cinematic system of representational transformations and substitutions, of spectral doublings, of double- and triple-crossings that engulf Nabokov's novels, living on throughout all history--registering indeed as operator of "history" itself insofar as "history" names simply the appalling "upheaval," the principle of rotation that converts world into representation, metamorphoses matter into memory, and unleashes the entire nebula of shadows and shadow plays that, under the pseudonym "cinema," befogs the Nabokovian oeuvre.