cisatlantic

cis·at·lan·tic

 (sĭs′ət-lăn′tĭk)
adj.
Situated on this side of the Atlantic Ocean.

cis•at•lan•tic

(ˌsɪs ətˈlæn tɪk)

adj.
on this (the speaker's or writer's) side of the Atlantic.
[1775–85, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is among the most useful and evocative books for conveying the complexity of activities in the North Atlantic, for seeing how cisatlantic activities in the late Middle Ages became transatlantic ties in the early modern era, and for linking developments in the North Atlantic with those in the North Pacific as Thule moved eastward.
William Boelhower's 'Renewing the Conceptual Dimensions of Italian-American Writing and Scholarship' argues that three concepts from the paradigm of Atlantic studies (the circumatlantic, the transatlantic and the cisatlantic) can be used to good effect in Italian American studies.
What is probably the most recent explication cisatlantic appears in Bryan A.
In fine, the anxiously awaited work that was to have crowned cisatlantic linguistic scholarship with a particular glory turns out to be a scandal and a disaster."
The obstacles in the reception of Sealsfield's works continued both in the trans- and cisatlantic study of literature up to the 1960s and 1970s.
Thirty years later, even so critical an Americanist as Lawrence Buell could complain about the "cisatlantic hermeticism" with which American literature is typically studied and plead for a greater sense of its postcolonial relationship to newer literatures without fundamentally questioning the national model itself.(5)