citizenship


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to citizenship: Dual citizenship

cit·i·zen·ship

 (sĭt′ĭ-zən-shĭp′)
n.
The status of a citizen with its attendant duties, rights, and privileges.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

citizenship

(ˈsɪtɪzənˌʃɪp)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the condition or status of a citizen, with its rights and duties
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person's conduct as a citizen: an award for good citizenship.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cit•i•zen•ship

(ˈsɪt ə zənˌʃɪp, -sən-)

n.
1. the state of being vested with the rights and duties of a citizen.
2. the character of an individual viewed as a member of society: an award for good citizenship.
[1605–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.citizenship - the status of a citizen with rights and dutiescitizenship - the status of a citizen with rights and duties
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
legal status - a status defined by law
2.citizenship - conduct as a citizen; "award for good citizenship"
demeanor, demeanour, deportment, behaviour, conduct, behavior - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مُوَاطَنَةمُواطَنَه
občanství
statsborgerskabindfødsret
kansalaisuus
državljanstvo
borgararéttindi
市民権
시민권
občianstvo
državljanstvo
medborgarskap
ความเป็นพลเมือง
quốc tịch

citizenship

[ˈsɪtɪznʃɪp] Nciudadanía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

citizenship

[ˈsɪtɪzənʃɪp]
n
[country] → citoyenneté f, nationalité f
(= civic values) → civisme m
modif [rights] → civique; [lessons, education, classes] → de civismecitric acid [ˌsɪtrɪkˈæsɪd] nacide m citrique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

citizenship

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

citizenship

[ˈsɪtɪznˌʃɪp] ncittadinanza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

citizen

(ˈsitizn) noun
1. an inhabitant of a city or town. a citizen of London.
2. a member of a state or country. a British citizen; a citizen of the USA.
ˈcitizenship noun
the status, rights and duties of a citizen, especially of a particular country etc. He has applied for British citizenship.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

citizenship

مُوَاطَنَة občanství statsborgerskab Staatsbürgerschaft υπηκοότητα ciudadanía kansalaisuus citoyenneté državljanstvo cittadinanza 市民権 시민권 burgerschap statsborgerskap obywatelstwo cidadania гражданство medborgarskap ความเป็นพลเมือง vatandaşlık quốc tịch 公民身份
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

citizenship

n. ciudadanía.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
It seems to be a construction scarcely avoidable, however, that those who come under the denomination of FREE INHABITANTS of a State, although not citizens of such State, are entitled, in every other State, to all the privileges of FREE CITIZENS of the latter; that is, to greater privileges than they may be entitled to in their own State: so that it may be in the power of a particular State, or rather every State is laid under a necessity, not only to confer the rights of citizenship in other States upon any whom it may admit to such rights within itself, but upon any whom it may allow to become inhabitants within its jurisdiction.
"No," cried he, becoming more and more eager, "Napoleon is great because he rose superior to the Revolution, suppressed its abuses, preserved all that was good in it- equality of citizenship and freedom of speech and of the press- and only for that reason did he obtain power."
They next proceed to make a law which fixes a sum of money as the qualification of citizenship; the sum is higher in one place and lower in another, as the oligarchy is more or less exclusive; and they allow no one whose property falls below the amount fixed to have any share in the government.
And how will his children be the gainers if he takes them into Thessaly, and deprives them of Athenian citizenship? Or if he leaves them behind, does he expect that they will be better taken care of by his friends because he is in Thessaly?
He is forced to admit that the state is not possible without the co-operation of men whom he will not admit to membership in it, either because they are not capable of sufficient rational appreciation of political ends, like the barbarians whom he thought were natural slaves, or because the leisure necessary for citizenship can only be gained by the work of the artisans who by that very work make themselves incapable of the life which they make possible for others.
If the United States becomes too hot for us, why I have qualified for citizenship in Turkey."*
In fact, this scaffold constituted a portion of a penal machine, which now, for two or three generations past, has been merely historical and traditionary among us, but was held, in the old time, to be as effectual an agent, in the promotion of good citizenship, as ever was the guillotine among the terrorists of France.
They were so pleased that they gave the regulation thirty days' notice, the required preparation for citizenship, and resolved to finish their days in this pleasant place.
"Yes, sir, I came quite recently from France; though, my employer being American, I suppose I am entitled to the rights of citizenship. Are you European, also?"
These were the questions of a home, a living, the rearing of children, education, citizenship, and the establishment and support of churches.
"Could you convince them that you are the son of the Princess Haja your welcome would be assured," said Turan; "while on the other hand you could purchase your freedom and citizenship with a brief period of labor in the diamond mines."
Roy Blanchard was hailed a hero and held up as a model of wealthy citizenship. And to save herself she could not help glowing with appreciation of his courage.

Full browser ?