citronella


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cit·ro·nel·la

 (sĭt′rə-nĕl′ə)
n.
1. A tropical Asian grass (Cymbopogon nardus) that has bluish-green, lemon-scented leaves and yields an essential oil.
2. A pale yellow to brownish aromatic oil obtained from this plant, used chiefly in perfumery and also in some insect repellents and commercial flavorings.

[New Latin, from French citronnelle, lemon oil, diminutive of citron, citron; see citron.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

citronella

(ˌsɪtrəˈnɛlə)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: citronella grass a tropical Asian grass, Cymbopogon (or Andropogon) nardus, with bluish-green lemon-scented leaves
2. (Biochemistry) Also called: citronella oil the yellow aromatic oil obtained from this grass, used in insect repellents, soaps, perfumes, etc
[C19: New Latin, from French citronnelle lemon balm, from citron lemon]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cit•ron•el•la

(ˌsɪ trəˈnɛl ə)

n.
1. a fragrant, S Asian grass, Cymbopogon nardus, cultivated as the source of citronella oil.
[1855–60; < New Latin < French citronelle=citron citron + -elle diminutive suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cit·ro·nel·la

(sĭt′rə-nĕl′ə)
The pale-yellow, lemon-scented oil obtained from the leaves of a tropical Asian grass, used in insect repellents and perfumes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: [170 Pages Report] Citronella Oil Market research report categorizes the global market By Source Type (Natural, Organic), By Form Type (Absolute, Concentrates, Blends), By Application (Therapeutics, Aromatherapy, Food & Beverages, Cosmetics, Toiletries, Fragrances, Cleaning & Home, Others), By Distribution Channel (Modern Trade, Franchise Outlets, Specialty Stores, Online), & by Region.
Grow an herb garden (aside from citronella plant, other herbs such as garlic, lemongrass, basil, peppermint, onions and rosemary can also help detract mosquitoes);
It had tried applying a non-toxic plant oil called Citronella on the swings, in a bid to deter dogs from chewing on the equipment.
5 Burn citronella oil, not candles Ditch the candles, says Howard - even the citronella ones, as the carbon dioxide from the flames attracts bugs, counteracting the effects of the repelling scent.
Now, researchers have modified cotton fabric to release a lemony citronella smell upon contact with sweat.
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted a study to determine the antibacterial and antifungal activity of 10 essential oils (ageratum, bael, citronella, eucalyptus, geranium, lemongrass, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, and peppermint) against 22 bacteria and 12 fungi.
It also comes in variety namely tomato, sunflower, carrot, citronella seeds, and basil, which is their fastest growing plant, germinating between five to ten days after planting.
The punishment can be via his sense of smell, via a collar that sprays citronella. If punishment is effective it will decrease the frequency of a behavior; if it doesn't, you are, at best, increasing his arousal and, at worst, scaring or hurting him.
Patio heaters will keep us snug, Citronella candles keep away the bugs.
The PetSafe Spray Bark Collar deters unwanted or excessive barking, whining and whimpering with a mild burst of citronella or unscented spray using a rechargeable, water-resistant collar.