citron

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cit·ron

 (sĭt′rən)
n.
1.
a. A thorny evergreen shrub or small tree (Citrus medica) native to India and widely cultivated for its large lemonlike fruits that have a thick warty rind.
b. The fruit of this plant, whose rind is often candied and used in confections and fruitcakes.
2. A globose watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. citroides) having white flesh that is candied or pickled.
3. A grayish-green yellow.

[Middle English, from Old French, alteration (influenced by limon, lemon) of Latin (mālum) citreum, citron (fruit), from citrus, citron tree.]

cit′ron adj.

citron

(ˈsɪtrən)
n
1. (Plants) a small Asian rutaceous tree, Citrus medica, having lemon-like fruit with a thick aromatic rind. See also citron wood
2. (Plants) the fruit of this tree
3. (Plants) Also called: citron melon a variety of watermelon, Citrullus vulgaris citroides, that has an inedible fruit with a hard rind
4. (Cookery) the rind of either of these fruits, candied and used for decoration and flavouring of foods
5. (Colours) a greenish-yellow colour
[C16: from Old French, from Old Provençal, from Latin citrus citrus tree]

cit•ron

(ˈsɪ trən)

n.
1. a pale yellow fruit resembling the lemon but larger and with thicker rind borne by a small tree, Citrus medica, allied to the lemon and lime.
2. the tree itself.
3. the rind of the fruit candied and preserved.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French < Italian citrone < Latin citr(us) citrus + Italian -one augmentative suffix]
citrus, citron - Latin citrus signified the citron, an Asian tree with lemonlike fruit; citron is a French derivative of citrus, coined on the model of French limon, "lemon."
See also related terms for lemon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.citron - large lemonlike fruit with thick aromatic rindcitron - large lemonlike fruit with thick aromatic rind; usually preserved
citrous fruit, citrus, citrus fruit - any of numerous fruits of the genus Citrus having thick rind and juicy pulp; grown in warm regions
citron tree, Citrus medica, citron - thorny evergreen small tree or shrub of India widely cultivated for its large lemonlike fruits that have thick warty rind
2.citron - thorny evergreen small tree or shrub of India widely cultivated for its large lemonlike fruits that have thick warty rindcitron - thorny evergreen small tree or shrub of India widely cultivated for its large lemonlike fruits that have thick warty rind
citron - large lemonlike fruit with thick aromatic rind; usually preserved
citrus tree, citrus - any of numerous tropical usually thorny evergreen trees of the genus Citrus having leathery evergreen leaves and widely cultivated for their juicy edible fruits having leathery aromatic rinds
citronwood - wood of a citron tree
Translations

citron

[ˈsɪtrən] N (= fruit) → cidra f; (= tree) → cidro m

citron

n (= fruit)Zitrone f; (= tree)Zitronenbaum m
References in classic literature ?
These almost impenetrable forests were composed of pomegranates, orange-trees, citrons, figs, olives, apricots, bananas, huge vines, whose blossoms and fruits rivaled each other in color and perfume.
The governor was a sort of happy farmer, harvesting wines, figs, oil, and oranges, preserving his citrons and
The fruit somewhat resembles in magnitude and general appearance one of our citron melons of ordinary size; but, unlike the citron, it has no sectional lines drawn along the outside.
There flourish the olive, the fig, the date, the orange, the citron, the pomegranate, and other fruits belonging to the voluptuous climates of the south; with grapes in abundance, that yield a generous wine.
There; I knew the girls did n't mean him," cried Maud, with a chop that sent the citron flying.
We stood in a great flagged court, with flowers and citron trees about us, and a huge tank in the centre that was receiving the waters of many pipes.
I saw here abundance of cocoa trees, orange, and lemon, and citron trees; but all wild, and very few bearing any fruit, at least not then.
To whom the Son of God, unmoved, replied:-- "Nor doth this grandeur and majestic shew Of luxury, though called magnificence, More than of arms before, allure mine eye, Much less my mind; though thou should'st add to tell Their sumptuous gluttonies, and gorgeous feasts On citron tables or Atlantic stone (For I have also heard, perhaps have read), Their wines of Setia, Cales, and Falerne, Chios and Crete, and how they quaff in gold, Crystal, and myrrhine cups, imbossed with gems And studs of pearl--to me should'st tell, who thirst And hunger still.